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The world’s very first Porsche design – the return of the “P1” …World premiere on the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum

 

 

World premiere on the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum: the return of the “P1”

World premiere on the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum: the return of the “P1”

Stuttgart. Since the construction of the first sportscar to bear the Porsche name – the Type 356 from 1948 – Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG has been regarded as the world’s leading sportscar manufacturer. Yet the company’s history dates back to a much earlier period: In 1898, Ferdinand Porsche presented the “Egger-Lohner electric vehicle, C.2 Phaeton model” (known as the “P1” for short) – the world’s first Porsche design.

Porsche engraved the code “P1” (standing for Porsche, number 1) onto all of the key components.

Porsche engraved the code “P1” (standing for Porsche, number 1) onto all of the key components.

After 116 years, the original and unrestored vehicle has been recovered and is set to enrich the Porsche Museum’s collection as a technical and historical worldwide sensation.

Five years since it opened in January 2009, the addition of this design sees the Porsche Museum reorient its permanent exhibition. Alongside a restructuring of the layout for the area dedicated to product and motorsport history, the “P1” now forms a centrepiece used to introduce visitors to the first part of the exhibition – the “prologue”.

The highly compact electric drive, weighing just 130 kg, offered an output of 3 hp.

The highly compact electric drive, weighing just 130 kg, offered an output of 3 hp.

The innovative vehicle concept of the “P1” will bridge the gap between the past and present-day developments such as the Porsche 918 Spyder. As a technological benchmark, the 918 Spyder follows a long tradition that first started 116 years ago with the “P1”.

The draft of "Egger-Lohner electric vehicle C.2 Phaeton".

The draft of “Egger-Lohner electric vehicle C.2 Phaeton”.

The “P1” – designed and built by Ferdinand Porsche – was one of the first vehicles registered in Austria, and took to the streets of Vienna on June 26, 1898.

In 1898, Ferdinand Porsche presented the "P1".

In 1898, Ferdinand Porsche presented the “P1”.

Porsche engraved the code “P1” (standing for Porsche, number 1) onto all of the key components, thus giving the electric vehicle its unofficial name. The sheer volume of ideas realised within this vehicle remains remarkable even today. The highly compact electric drive, weighing just 130 kg, offered an output of 3 hp. For short periods, up to 5 hp could be achieved in overloading mode, allowing the P1 to reach up to 35 km/h. When driven in this manner, the vehicle speed was regulated via a 12-speed controller. The overall range of the vehicle could span up to 80 kilometres, a considerable feat for a vehicle of that period. A further innovation was the Lohner alternating vehicle body, which allowed the vehicle to be used in both summer and winter.

The overall range of the vehicle could span up to 80 kilometres.

The overall range of the vehicle could span up to 80 kilometres.

The first practical test awaited the “P1” in September 1899 at the international motor vehicle exhibition in the German capital of Berlin. Even as early as 1899, the competition to produce the best drive systems was already fierce. A race for electric vehicles over a distance of 40 km was announced in Berlin for September 28 to test the performance of the vehicles, with a prize to be awarded to the winner. The route demanded a great amount of skill from the participants, who had to tackle challenges such as gradients. With three passengers on board, Ferdinand Porsche steered his “P1” across the finish line 18 minutes ahead of the next competitor. More than half the participants failed to reach the finish line due to technical difficulties. Ferdinand Porsche also came out on top in the efficiency test, as his “P1” recorded the lowest energy consumption in urban traffic.

On Friday, January 31, 2014, Dr. Wolfgang Porsche, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, and Matthias Müller, President and CEO of Porsche AG, will unveil the “P1” before an audience of invited guests. The following weekend, on February 1 and 2, the “P1” can be viewed free of charge as part of the celebrations to mark the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum.

On February 1st, 2014 for the very first time on display at the Porsche Museum: The first design of Ferdinand Porsche from 1898.

On February 1st, 2014 for the very first time on display at the Porsche Museum: The first design of Ferdinand Porsche from 1898.

The museum is open Tuesday to Sunday, 9:00 to 18:00. For more information, please visit http://www.porsche.com/museum.

SOURCE

Communication Porsche AG
Porsche Museum

 

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Porsche’s Secret Studebaker Identified on the Drawing Board as Porsche Project Type 542

The Studebaker/Porsche Project

Is that the Studebaker Porsche Project Type 542 under that cover at the Porsche Design Studio? 


After Ferdinand Porsche died, his son Ferry was asked by the Studebaker Company, to design a new car. Porsche suggested a 4 cylinder 1.500 cc coupe, rear engine car but that was not accepted by Studebaker, which wanted a 6 cylinder, much larger car with a front engine. Earlier in the 1950s Studebaker entered into serious discussions with Porsche regarding the German company developing a compact car for the South Bend firm.

Anxious to expand its presence in the U.S. and prodded by Volkswagen importer Max Hoffman, Porsche worked up a design proposal that it dubbed the Type 542, a rear-engined, four-door sedan somewhat smaller than Studebaker’s Champion.

Porsche produced a running protype and sent it to South Bend for evaluation.  Distracted by its financial problems, Studebaker didn’t take a serious look at the prototype until 1956 when the company’s director of experimental engineering, John Z. DeLorean, gave it a thumbs-down and the project was DOA.

 Yes, that would be the same John DeLorean who later built his OWN sports car and, whatever his other failings, DeLorean was, by all accounts, a brilliant engineer. He was also an American in an era when American car people tended to give short shrift to ideas that ran contrary to prevailing practices in Detroit. In this vein, DeLorean’s report was highly critical of everything about the Porsche prototype that was distinctively European:

“Some excessive vertical shake was noted…There still remains considerable lateral movement and rear-end steering, with undesirable amounts of oversteer noted in moderate to hard cornering. There is uneven tire wear…The car steers quickly, but hard, and requires constant attention and correction for road wander. Cross-winds and slippery spots make driving tedious and rather dangerous..

“The radiator, grille, hood and deck slopes are quite steep and not in keeping with current American boxy-styling. The car is full width but rather short…It appears small and bug-like due to the sloping hood and squeezed-in rear fender treatment…

“This vehicle has a large amount of technical appeal, but a number of items need refinement to increase its overall appeal as a small car to the average American car buyer…The 1956 Champion or Commander is preferred to the Porsche [Z-87] for American driving…”

Turning Wheels, February 1977

In 1952 Porsche begins the project and after 18 months the prototype was ready to be tested. Labeled as Porsche Project 542. Karl Rabe was the chief engineer.


Porsche proposed a 6V rear engine four door as shown in picture below. It was to have a 2,82 m wheelbase, independent suspension and was to try two different cooling systems, one air-cooled, another composite air-water, named internally the 542L ( L from Luft=Air in German) and the 542W (W from Wasser=water in German) 90×80 mm

Studebaker – Porsche Project 542. Karl Rabe was the chief engineer.


These were rated as follows: 
The air cooled version weighted 220KG, and had an output of 98 HP at 3700 rpm. 
The water cooled version weighed 206 KG had an output 106 HP at 3500 rpm.

Above: The air and water cooled engine.

Below: The final water-cooled engine.

Above: A Studebaker sketch for a small car. Note rear air intake fins.


They both were tested in Europe and Porsche traveled to USA in 1954 with four prototypes, two of each engine type. When he arrived, Studebaker had been bought by Packard and the new firm was not interested in the project.

Turning Wheels, February 1977

Turning Wheels, February 1977

Turning Wheels, February 1977


That was the end of the Studebaker/Porsche.

 Porsche also proposed a compact car much like the “square-back” Volkswagen that was built in the latter 1960s. It, too, failed to spark much interest in South Bend and that the end of the fruitless relationship between Porsche and Studebaker.

Shortly after this episode, Studebaker entered into agreements with aircraft manufacturer Curtiss-Wright over a variety of management and manufacturing issues, one upshot of which was that Curtiss-Wright would take over management of Studebaker for a period of time.  In 1959 Curtiss-Wright engineers, for reasons known only to them, bought a Studebaker Lark from a dealer, removed the entire drive train and installed a 1953 Porsche boxer engine, suspension and transaxle in the rear of the car.

Whatever their reasons for cobbling together this prototype, the project went nowhere, Curtiss-Wright soon divorced itself from Studebaker and the pride of South Bend continued down the road to extinction.

An excerpt from “www.studegarage.com/porsche.htm” ( Link below)In February, 1959 Curtis-Wright bought a new Lark with a Champ 6 engine from a local dealer and modified it. A used engine from a 1953 Porsche was rebuilt by Porsche and installed along with the torsion-bar rear suspension and transaxle. Wheels and gear reduction boxes from a VW bus were used to optimize the drive line. This engine was placed in what had been the trunk of the Lark after removing the Champ 6 and automatic transmission from the front of the car. In addition, since Curtis-Wright had taken out a license to build Wankel rotary engines, an adapter was prepared to install a small Wankel engine in place of the Porsche engine. This car may have been the prototype for the sub-compact touted two years later.Before the car could be fully tested and the rotary engine installed, the relationship between Curtis-Wright and Studebaker ended. The Lark was sold to a local New Jersey garage, then quickly resold twice more to car collectors. The car still survives and has occasionally appeared at car shows in New England. It retains the 1500 cc, 70 hp Porsche engine in the trunk. While the horsepower rating is less than the Champ 6 it replaced, the much lower weight of the Porsche engine and transmission help, but it is not a high-performance car. The engine produces peak horsepower at 5,000 rpm. 

Images from the Studebaker Museum, May 2007

Studebaker’s that never were

 1961 studebaker prototypeIn March, 1961 Studebaker released a sketch of a sub-compact car planned for future introduction.  It called for a four-cylinder, air-cooled, rear engine of 65-75 horsepower.  Wheelbase was about 100 inches, much shorter than the Lark of the time.  Seating was for four or five passengers.  Studebaker hoped to get the car to market by the fall of 1962 at a price under $2000.   The car never made it to production, but there was more to it than just an artist’s sketch.   It was known as a Porsche Type 633, the result of an association with Porsche that started in 1952.studebaker porsche type 633
Porsche built a car for Studebaker in August, 1952 with a 120-degree V-6 engine .   This was the Porsche Type 542, also known as the Z-87 car at Studebaker.   Though it was looked at then, it didn’t get serious review until 1956 when Studebaker’s director of experimental engineering tested the car and reported on it.   The director’s name: John Z. DeLorean, who later went on to other cars and other activities.  He didn’t like the Porsche effort and compared it unfavorably to the comfort and ride of the 1956 Champion and Commander.  Interestingly, this appears to have been the only 4-door Porsche until the Cayenne SUV was introduced for 2003.In later years, a Lark was modified to have a Porsche engine and transaxle installed in the trunk area.  Curtis-Wright Corporation owned nearly half of the Studebaker stock in the late 1950’s and took over management of the company.   Development efforts were conducted at their New Jersey facility.

1959 Studebaker Lark w Porsche engine
In February, 1959 Curtis-Wright bought a new Lark with a Champ 6 engine from a local dealer and modified it.  A used engine from a 1953 Porsche was rebuilt by Porsche and installed along with the torsion-bar rear suspension and transaxle.  Wheels and gear reduction boxes from a VW bus were used to optimize the drive line.  This engine was placed in what had been the trunk of the Lark after removing the Champ 6 and automatic transmission from the front of the car.  In addition, since Curtis-Wright had taken out a license to build Wankel rotary engines, an adapter was prepared to install a small Wankel engine in place of the Porsche engine.  This car may have been the prototype for the sub-compact touted two years later.
Before the car could be fully tested and the rotary engine installed, the relationship between Curtis-Wright and Studebaker ended.  The Lark was sold to a local New Jersey garage, then quickly resold twice more to car collectors.  The car still survives and has occasionally appeared at car shows in New England.  It retains the 1500 cc, 70 hp Porsche engine in the trunk.  While the horsepower rating is less than the Champ 6 it replaced, the much lower weight of the Porsche engine and transmission help, but it is not a high-performance car.  The engine produces peak horsepower at 5,000 rpm.

 

(A detailed discussion of Porsche’s involvement with Studebaker can be found here.)

More added here

Source:  Studebaker/Porsche Project http://oldcarandtruckpictures.com/Studebaker/TheEnd.html

 Karl Ludvigsen outlined in SIA #24, September-October 1974. Studebaker’s first involvement with Porsche came earlier in the 1950s, in an earlier attempt to build a compact car. Porsche’s engineers came up with several designs and even whipped up a prototype car and a pair of prototype engines. The exact connection between that prototype and the later experimental car, however, remains unknown.

SIA-StudeByPorsche_01_225.jpgSIA-StudeByPorsche_02_225.jpg

SIA-StudeByPorsche_03_225.jpg SIA-StudeByPorsche_04_225.jpg

While the American firm struggled on, the project had supplied a good deal of funding to Porsche when they needed it most. While Studebaker and Packard were closing factories, Porsche was building new ones. Studebaker-Packard did manage to get a piece of the late 1950s imported car market eventually though – they became the American importers of Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union before exiting the auto industry all together in the mid 1960s. (Imagine what Max Hoffman must have thought.) The rest, as they say, is history.

Much research credit must be given to Karl Ludvigsen’s articles on this topic from the mid-1970s.

 

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DOCUMENTARY FILM OCT 15TH, 2012: Meet MAGNUS WALKER – Urban Outlaw, rebel Porsche Customizer

Urban Outlaw

A portrait of Magnus Walker, the rebel Porsche customizer who turned a hobby into an obsession, and an obsession into a successful business.

,,,a sample of Magnus Walkers Porsche collection (photos by Magnus, collage created by dede seward)

From a workshop in downtown Los Angeles, Magnus obsessively harvests fragments from donor 911s, grafting them onto vintage frames to create one-of kind automobiles with the spirit of Ferdinand Porsche but an ethos entirely his own.

Inside the garage of Magnus Walker. Photo by: Magnus Walker

A few more Porsche 911s owned by Magnus Walker. Photo by: Magnus Walker

ABOUT Magnus Walker:

My love affair with PORSCHE began as a 10 year old kid, and a trip to the 1977 LONDON motor show.

That is where I laid my eyes upon a 77-930 Martini TURBO!
As a kid growing up in SHEFFIELD-ENGLAND Porches were not a common sight. Sure I had the TURBO poster on my wall, lusted after one, and even wrote a letter to the Porsche factory!

Hey… They even wrote back!
Saying words to the affect “give us a call back when you are older”.

Fast forward a few years, and in 1986 at the age of 19 I moved to America and started a new life in LOS ANGELES..

At the age of 25 in 1992 I acquired my first 911, now almost 20 years later and over 40 -911 cars later I am living my PORSCHE dream.

I have done some club racing and instructing with the POC throughout the past 10 years. Over the past few years I have been expanding my 64-73 early car collection and have been building quite a few “sports purpose” R -ST inspired streetable track type cars.

My builds are starting to gain world wide attention, and a few unique touches such as my grafted R turn signals, louvered deck lids, drilled door handles and attention to detail to name a few are becoming my “signature marks”.

Magnus Walker poses with his 1971 Porsche 911. Photo by Magnus Walker.

Magnus Walker The Outlaw. The Trailer.

Producer / Director: Tamir Moscovici (MOS), Industry Films
Line Producer: Dwight Phipps, Industry Films
DP: Anthony Arendt, Partos
Editor: Paul Proulx, Stealing Time
Colourist: Wade Odlum, Alter Ego
Audio House: Pirate Toronto

mosmedia.ca
industryfilms.com
urbanoutlaw.tv

Random 911 Porsches

LONDON CALLING……..

Its official URBAN OUTLAW short documentary film
accepted into the RAINDANCE FILM FESTIVAL in London.

Urban Outlaw | Raindance Film Festival 2012

“The film, a passion project, would never have been funded in the traditional studio system.  Through word of mouth, enthusiasts, bloggers and journalist, we have built a global fan base, our fans are passionate, and we don’t want to make them wait any longer.”  – Tamir Moscovici

Supplemental,…In association with MOS MEDIA, INDUSTRY FILMS & MAGNUSWALKER911.COM

is proud to announce the release of URBAN OUTLAW. URBAN OUTLAW

will be distributed & released worldwide online via Reelhouse.org.

  RELEASE DATE: Oct 15 2012  

Since the trailer was released in late May of 2012 it obtained over a 1.2 million click throughs.  The initial intent was to submit the film to festivals.  Since submitting the film to festivals and competitions the film has won a prestigious Award of Merit from the Best Shorts Competition, for short documentary.  The film is schedule to debut in London at the Raindance Film Festival on Sept. 28 2012and will play in Atlanta and Edmonton shortly there after.

While the film continues to navigate the festival circuit, Tamir & Magnus have decided that limiting the viewership to select cities, with limited seating, would be the wrong choice for the film. .  Following  Raindance the film will be made available online.

“The film, a passion project, would never have been funded in the traditional studio system.  Through word of mouth, enthusiasts, bloggers and journalist, we have built a global fan base, our fans are passionate, and we don’t want to make them wait any longer. “  – Tamir Moscovici 

We’ve opted to go with Reelhouse.org, a new platform for film audiences.  Knowing that we were going to release the film globally we wanted a platform that could create a theatrical experience that was intimate.  Reelhouse is more then a micro site, or faceless link for audiences to view.

Through Reelhouse.org viewers can reach out toMagnus Walker and to the filmmaker.  In the spirit of Louis C.K., and the filmmakers behind Press Pause Play, this is a new age in filmmaking, let’s cut out the distributors, studios and marketers.  Let good film connect with an audience, and let that audience connect with the filmmakers.

If the audience likes the film, they can support the filmmakers.  In short, let’s continue down the path of accessible art for the masses.

 WATCH IT HERE: http://www.reelhouse.org/mos/urbanoutlaw

Source: Magnus Walker himself

reelhouse.org/mos/urbanoutlaw

Reelhouse reelhouse.org

 

 

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New special exhibition “80 years of Porsche Engineering” – Unusual exhibits in the Porsche Museum

Stuttgart, Baden-WÃrttemberg : Porsche Museum ©  2009 Jochen Keute, Frankfurt am Main (Click on photo to enlarge)

Stuttgart. In establishing his engineering office in Stuttgart in 1931, Ferdinand Porsche laid the foundations for the future success of what is today Porsche AG. The Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart museum is paying tribute to this milestone with a new special exhibition “80 years of Porsche Engineering”.

Ferdinand Porsche (left) and engine specialist Josef Kales 1937 in the Porsche engineering office at Kronenstrasse 24 in Stuttgart.(Click on photo to enlarge)

From 21 June until 11 September, 2011 visitors will be able to experience the most important and exciting customer developments of the past eight decades.

(Click on photo to enlarge)

On display will be approximately 20 special exhibits ranging from the development of entire vehicles via engines and transmissions to remarkable industrial projects of the present day.

(Click on photo to enlarge)

For example, among the exhibition pieces you will find one of the first Porsche developments that the Chemnitz-based car manufacturer Wanderer placed with the engineering office in 1931: the Wanderer W22, also known in-house at Porsche as the Type 7. This mid-size saloon features a six-cylinder alloy engine with 1.7 or two litre displacement that was also later to power the famous “Audio front”.

Two years later Auto Union commissioned the design of a Grand Prix racing car, which is now one of the most legendary racing cars of all time. Driven by motor racing legends such as Hans Stuck and Bernd Rosemeyer the Auto Union “P racing car” achieved no fewer than 30 Grand Prix victories and 15 world records between 1934 and 1937.

Hans Stuck in the Auto-Union racing car at the 1934 Brno Grand Prix at the Masaryk-Ring. Ferdinand Porsche is next to Hans Stuck on the left.(Click on photo to enlarge)

The “Opel Zafira” compact MPV as well, which Porsche designed in 1994 for Adam Opel AG, will enjoy equal billing with the Mercedes-Benz 500 E, which was in series production between 1990 and 1995 in Porsche’s very own Zuffenhausen plant.

The anniversary exhibition, the most comprehensive special event since the museum first opened, will also surprise the visitor with unusual Porsche know-how beyond the automotive arena.

(Click on photo to enlarge)

In addition to a Harley-Davidson “V-Rod”, the Porsche Museum will also be exhibiting the original racing sled that Porsche engineers designed together with professional sportsman Georg Hackl.

(Click on photo to enlarge)

It was with this model that Hackl, a professional sportsman, won the Olympic silver medal in 2002.

(Click on photo to enlarge)

The “Adventure” electric wheelchair with independent four-wheel spring suspension will also be on show, designed by Porsche in 2004 on behalf of Ulrich Alber GmbH.

In addition to the already familiar guided tour offering of the permanent exhibition, the Porsche museum also provides exclusive tours of the “80 years of Porsche Engineering” special exhibition. The visitor service can be reached on +49(0)711 911 20911 or via e-mail info.museum@porsche.de for inquiries about dates and bookings.

Next generation of inventors wanted

The Porsche museum is staging a creative competition for young boffins: Children up to the age of 12 are invited to follow in the footsteps of Ferdinand Porsche. The next generation of engineers has until August 22 to submit their own original ideas and inventions on anything and everything to do with the car. Materials as diverse as wood, plasticine, paper or polystyrene are allowed.

This will culminate in the award of a prize for the most ingenious ideas. The handiwork can either be submitted in person at the Porsche museum information desk or sent by post under the heading “Next generation of inventors wanted”: Porsche museum, visitor service, Porscheplatz, 70435 Stuttgart.

The Porsche Museum is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Further information is available online at www.porsche.com/museum.

CLICK on Photos to enlarge

Source: Porsche AG – Porsche Museum

Public Relations and Media
Porsche-Museum
Astrid Böttinger

 

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1938 Porsche Type 64 – on display at The Allure of the Automobile exhibition High Museum of Art in Atlanta

Porsche Type 64 from 1939 Photo from herrenzimmer.de.

1938 Porsche Type 64 Berlin Rome Car…. The Porsche Museum in Germany has sent its legendary Type 64 Berlin Rome Car on a long journey to Atlanta where it will be on display at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the “The Allure of the Automobile” exhibition from March 21st until June 20th, 2010 to celebrate the brand’s 60th Anniversary in America.

“Type 64 is of very special significance to the history of the Porsche brand: Built in 1938/39 under the guidance of Ferdinand Porsche… It was beautiful, dynamic and fast – and it quickly became Ferdinand Porsche’s great passion: Although this unique sports car built for the Berlin-Rome long-distance race bore nothing but the simple model designation “Type 64”, it is acknowledged as the “original Porsche”, the“great-grandfather” of all Porsches to follow. Within and beneath its streamlined aluminum Type 64 boasts the trendsetting concepts so characteristic of all Porsche sports cars following in the years to come.

Porsche Typ 60 K 10 – Porsche Typ 64 Berlin-Rom 1939…from kitchener.lord Source-MotorKlassik-2

In terms of design and aerodynamics this unique Coupé was far ahead of its time, the symbiosis of motorsport qualities and production features creating an ideal grand touring car. On public roads Type 64 reached a top speed of no less than 130 km/h or 81 mph. Ferdinand Porsche often drove this car himself, showing his deep satisfaction by presenting the Porsche family name on the car itself. Story by Porsche AG Driving the 1938 Porsche Type 64K10

 via youtube.com

The Porsche 64, also known as the VW Aerocoupe, Type 64 and Type 60K10, is considered by many to be the first automobile from what was to become the Porsche company, as a true design precursor to the production model of after the war. The model number comes from the fact that it was built mainly from design drawings for the Type-64 “record car”. Most mechanical parts came from the 38 prototype series. The chassis was heavily reinforced and the engine also reworked to produce around 45-50 brake horse power. The Type-64 was only a drawing until the three racers were built.

The body was also a compromise in that the cab had to look like a KdF car, but the rest was ‘record’ car. The VW beetle was the Type-60, and the name the “60K10” means body design 10 for the Type-60 Beetle. Its flat-four engine produced 50 bhp and gave a top speed of around 160 km/h (99 mph). The body design was made by the Porsche Büro after wind tunnel tests for a planned V10 sports car that never came into existence, the Type 114. Dr. Porsche promoted the idea to enter the car into the 1939 Berlin-Rome race as a public relations ploy. Three cars were made in hand shaped aluminum by the bodywork company Reutter.

Porsche Typ 60 K 10 – Porsche Typ 64 Berlin-Rom 1939…from kitchener.lord Source-MotorKlassik

One was destroyed early in World War II. The two remaining were used by the Porsche family.  Eventually they only used one of them and put the other in storage.  In May 1945 American troops discovered the one put in storage, cut the roof off and used it for joyriding for a few weeks until the engine gave up and it was scrapped.

The last remaining Porsche 64 was owned by Ferry Porsche who had it restored by Battista Farina in 1947. In 1949 it was sold to the Austrian motorcycle racer Otto Mathé and with it he won the Alpine Rally in 1950. The last time he drove it in a race was at the Monterey Historic Races in Monterey, California, in 1982.

 
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Posted by on March 16, 2010 in Porsche, Porsche Type 64

 

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