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What’s on the hood of every Porsche? – The complex re-production of the Porsche Crest, made in Germany

Relaunch of the original Porsche Crest from 1954 – 1973

It’s the little things that make a classic complete. Porsche crests for the Porsche 356 and the early 911, of course, “Made in Germany”.

The original crest as a quality seal.

An essential and much-loved detail of the Porsche 356 and the early Porsche 911 is now available again. Following extensive research, the experts at Porsche Classic have reproduced the original Porsche crest.

The Evolution of Porsche Crest

The relaunched crest is true to the colours and materials of the original and is, of course, “Made in Germany”. The new Porsche Crests are available for the front hood handle of all Porsche 356 (model year 1954 – 1965) and for the hood of the early 911 models (model year 1963 – 1973). As of August 2012, you can order them via your local Porsche centre.

1. Production of the special tool: engraving

Still in the Classic product range are the 911 Porsche Crests for the model years 1974 – 1998.

Such an unmistakeable and sought-after symbol has naturally had a very colourful and sometimes unusual history and been copied many times.

2. Stamping of the blanks

To eliminate all doubt, the experts at Porsche Classic delved deep into the history of the crest, which was first suggested as a quality seal for the Type 356 at a meeting between Ferry Porsche and US importer Max Hoffman back in 1952.

3. Brazing of the fixing pins

In the same year, advertising manager Herrmann Lapper and designer Franz Xaver Reimspieß produced a preliminary design that is still used to this day with just a few minor differences in detail. Reimspieß, who is also said to have designed the Volkswagen logo in 1936, sketched a magnificent crest that symbolised the roots of the company as well as the dynamism and quality of its products.

4. Polishing of the crests

At the centre of the golden shield, the horse of the official coat of arms of Stuttgart is depicted along with the name of the city. The composition is surrounded by the red and black state colours and the stylised antlers from the crest of Württemberg-Hohenzollern. The all-encompassing Porsche logo acts as a protective “roof” over all the design elements.

5. Silver and gold plating of the crests

In contrast to the current crest, the Porsche logo on the original crest was only embossed and was not black. In addition, the red elements of the crest were actually more orange in colour to reflect the Württemberg-Hohenzollern state colours.

6. Application of the enamel coating

The Classic experts charged with reproducing the crest went a lot further than merely ensuring that the colours were true to the original. The crest is being produced using special tools based on original drawings. The silver and gold plating is being applied using the same technique as the original and the colour and enamelling are being meticulously applied by hand.

7. Quality check of the final crest

The new “old” crest has also had to undergo the same quality tests as the original. This involved the simulation of a stone impact test using a ballistic firing range at the Research and Development Centre in Weissach. The crest also spent 240 hours in the salt spray chamber.

The Porsche crest passed these challenging tests with flying colours, thus proving its credentials as a genuine quality product, 100 per cent made in Germany.

The Evolution of Porsche Crest

This symbol, steeped in history, signals a continued long life for classic Porsche models.

Paraphrasing from “Excellence was Expected”:

The design was created by Ferry Porsche (on the proverbial napkin sketch) at the request of Max Hoffman, and refined/finalized by Erwin Komeda. The emblem first appeared on the steering wheel hubs of Porsches in 1953.

SOURCE: Porsche AG Media Database

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2012 in Germany, Porsche, PORSCHE CREST, Porsche Design, Weissach

 

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Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG mourns great designer Ferdinand Alexander Porsche

Press Release 05/04/2012
Ferdinand Alexander Porsche with 911 Carrera 2 3,6 Coupé Mj. 1992

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche with 911 Carrera 2 3,6 Coupé Mj. 1992

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche dies

Stuttgart
Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, is mourning Professor Ferdinand Alexander Porsche.The Honorary President of the Supervisory Board died on 5 April 2012 in Salzburg, aged 76.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1990)

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1990)

Matthias Müller, President and Chief Executive Officer of Porsche AG, paid tribute to Ferdinand Alexander Porsche’s services to the sports car manufacturer:

“We mourn the death of our partner, Ferdinand Alexander Porsche. As the creator of the Porsche 911, he established a design culture in our company that has shaped our sports cars to this very day. His philosophy of good design is a legacy to us that we will honour for all time.”

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche was born in Stuttgart on 11 December 1935, the oldest son of Dorothea and Ferry Porsche.

Ferry Porsche (left) in his office with his son Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (ca. 1960)


Ferry Porsche (left) in his office with his son Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (ca. 1960)

Even his childhood was shaped by cars, and he spent much of his time in the engineering offices and development workshops of his grandfather Ferdinand Porsche. In 1943 the family accompanied the Porsche company’s move to Austria, where he went to school in Zell am See.

After returning to Stuttgart in 1950, he attended the private Waldorf school. After leaving school, he enrolled at the prestigious Ulm School of Design.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche in his Design office (1963)


Ferdinand Alexander Porsche in his Design office (1963)

In 1958, F.A. Porsche, as he was known by his colleagues, joined the engineering office of what was then Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche KG. He soon proved his great talent for design by sculpting the first model of a successor to the 356 model line out of plasticine.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche next to Modell Typ 911 (1968)

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche next to Modell Typ 911 (1968)

In 1962 he took over as head of the Porsche design studio, creating a worldwide furore one year later with the Porsche 901 (or 911). With the Porsche 911, F.A. Porsche created a sports car icon whose timeless and classical form survives to this very day in what is now the seventh 911 generation.

Porsche Typ 901 (T8), next to model: Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1963)

Porsche Typ 901 (T8), next to model: Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1963)

However, in addition to passenger cars, F.A. Porsche also concerned himself with designing the sports cars of the 1960s. His best-known designs include the Type 804 Formula One racing car or the Porsche 904 Carrera GTS, now considered to be one of the most beautiful racing cars ever.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1989)

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1989)

In the course of the conversion of Porsche KG into a joint-stock corporation in 1971/72, Ferdinand Alexander Porsche, along with all the other family members, stood down from the company’s front-line business operations.

In 1972 he founded the “Porsche Design Studio” in Stuttgart, the head office of which was relocated to Zell am See in Austria in 1974. In the decades that followed, he designed numerous classic gentlemen’s accessories such as watches, spectacles and writing implements that achieved global recognition under the “Porsche Design” brand. In parallel, with his team, he designed a plethora of industrial products, household appliances and consumer durables for internationally renowned clients under the brand “Design by F.A. Porsche”.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1965)


Ferdinand Alexander Porsche (1965)

A strong and clear design concept typifies all product designs created in his design studio to date. The credo of his design work was:

“Design must be functional and functionality has to be translated visually into aesthetics, without gags that have to be explained first.”

F.A. Porsche: “A coherently designed product requires no adornment; it should be enhanced by its form alone.” The design’s appearance should be readily comprehensible and not detract from the product and its function.

His conviction was: “Good design should be honest.”

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche received numerous honours and awards both for his work as a designer as well as for individual designs. For example, in 1968 the “Comité Internationale de Promotion et de Prestige” honoured him for the outstanding aesthetic design of the Porsche 911 while the Industrial Forum Design Hannover (iF) voted him “Prizewinner of the Year” in 1992.

Ferry (right) and Ferdinand Alexander Porsche in the Porsche Design-Studio (ca. 1959)

Ferry (right) and Ferdinand Alexander Porsche in the Porsche Design-Studio (ca. 1959)

In 1999, the President of Austria bestowed on him the title of Professor.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche retained a close lifelong association with Porsche AG as a partner and member of the Supervisory Board. For example, even after stepping down from front-line business operations, he contributed to the design of Porsche’s sports cars over many decades and repeatedly steered the company in the right di-rection. This was especially the case for the difficult period Porsche experienced at the beginning of the 1990s.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche with model 911 S Targa (1968)

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche with model 911 S Targa (1968)

From 1990 to 1993, F.A. Porsche served as President of the company’s Supervisory Board, thus playing a major role in Porsche A.G’s eco-nomic turnaround. In 2005, he stood down from his Supervisory Board role in favour of his son Oliver and assumed the mantle of Honorary President of the Supervisory Board.

Ferdinand Alexander Porsche will be buried in the family grave at Schüttgut in Zell am See, attended by his immediate family. An official funeral service will be held in Stuttgart at a later date.

SOURCE: Communication Porsche AG
Head of Communication Porsche AG
Hans-Gerd Bode

 

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PORSCHE: “125 years of the car” birthday procession kicks off on the Porscheplatz

 Summer 2011: Germany celebrates cars

Automobilsommer 2011

Germany – birthplace of the inventors of the automobile and home to chief brands in the four wheels market, such as Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Audi, Volkswagen and Porsche, of course – is celebrating the 125° anniversary of this mean of transportation with a series of events in several cities. The hub of celebrations will be the region of Baden-Württemberg and its capital, Stuttgart.

FOR PORSCHE: “125 years of the car” birthday procession kicks off on the Porscheplatz

Porsche classic cars on the streets of Stuttgart

Stuttgart. On Sunday 8 May 2011, Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, will be teaming up with Mercedes-Benz and Audi, two other car brands also based in Baden-Württemberg, to stage a car procession through Stuttgart. 125 vehicles, contemporary witnesses all, will bring the history of the three carmakers to life – in some cases with well-known drivers at the wheel.

The Zuffenhausen sports car manufacturer will be putting 45 current and historic vehicles from more than six decades of Porsche history on the start line.

The “125 years of the car” procession will get under way at 11.00 a.m. at the Porsche museum, which will be offering visitors free admission on the day.

Matthias Müller, Chairman of the Board of Management of Porsche AG, will head the birthday procession in a Porsche 911 Turbo S – together with his Mercedes-Benz and Audi opposite numbers.

Dr. Wolfgang Porsche, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Porsche Automobil Holding SE, will be driving the first Porsche prototype, the Type 356 “No. 1”, developed by his father Ferry Porsche in 1948.


Ferry Porsche with the Porsche Type 356 “Nr. 1”

Current and former Porsche AG works and racing drivers will also be taking part in the drive through the town. For example, racing legend Hans Hermann will be piloting the Porsche 917 KH on the streets of Stuttgart, the same car he and Richard Attwood drove in the 1970 Le Mans 24 Hours when they won the first ever overall victory for the Zuffenhausen company.

Le Mans winner car 917 KH with Hans Herrmann and Richard Attwood.

The three times winning Porsche 908/03 Spyder is being withdrawn from the Porsche museum’s exhibition for Porsche works driver Marc Lieb.

Porsche 908/03 Spyder – 970 2997cc 350PS

Finally, the 612 hp (450 kW) Carrera GT high performance sports car, once limited to 1,270 units, will be driven by double world rally champion Walter Röhrl.

In addition to a “police presence”, the car procession will also give an outing to the Swabian sense of humour. Stuttgart “Tatort” (Crime Scene Investigation) Inspector Richy Müller will be switching on the blue lights on the Porsche 356 C Cabriolet. In the Sixties, this classic car was used by the Württemberg motorway police.

http://c.photoshelter.com/img-get/I0000bU1y7De_V2g/s/860/860/Stylin-Police-InterceptorPolice Interceptor, German style: A 1956 Porsche 356C 1600SC Cabriolet.

And cabaret artist Christof Sonntag will be behind the wheel of a Porsche 911 Targa (Type 964).

The destination of the procession that will start at Zuffenhausen’s Porscheplatz is the Schlossplatz in the centre of Stuttgart. Here there will be an opportunity on Sunday afternoon to admire all the participating vehicles at close quarters.

https://i1.wp.com/lh4.ggpht.com/_5VSk9dzp-oo/S0jnvIN7l4I/AAAAAAAABHU/tRJFUCPEq4Y/DSC_0011.JPG

Porsche will also be showcasing itself on the Schlossplatz as part of an innovation exhibition true to its “Porsche Intelligent Performance” philosophy: more power with lower consumption, increased efficiency and reduced CO2 emissions.

Three modern day Porsche vehicles await the visitor there, providing an impressive demonstration of alternative driveline technologies: the Porsche Boxster E, the Porsche Cayenne S Hybrid and the Porsche 911 GT3 R.

SOURCE: PORSCHE AG DATABASE

(photos courtesy of Porsche AG)

 

 

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1938 Porsche Type 64 – on display at The Allure of the Automobile exhibition High Museum of Art in Atlanta

Porsche Type 64 from 1939 Photo from herrenzimmer.de.

1938 Porsche Type 64 Berlin Rome Car…. The Porsche Museum in Germany has sent its legendary Type 64 Berlin Rome Car on a long journey to Atlanta where it will be on display at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the “The Allure of the Automobile” exhibition from March 21st until June 20th, 2010 to celebrate the brand’s 60th Anniversary in America.

“Type 64 is of very special significance to the history of the Porsche brand: Built in 1938/39 under the guidance of Ferdinand Porsche… It was beautiful, dynamic and fast – and it quickly became Ferdinand Porsche’s great passion: Although this unique sports car built for the Berlin-Rome long-distance race bore nothing but the simple model designation “Type 64”, it is acknowledged as the “original Porsche”, the“great-grandfather” of all Porsches to follow. Within and beneath its streamlined aluminum Type 64 boasts the trendsetting concepts so characteristic of all Porsche sports cars following in the years to come.

Porsche Typ 60 K 10 – Porsche Typ 64 Berlin-Rom 1939…from kitchener.lord Source-MotorKlassik-2

In terms of design and aerodynamics this unique Coupé was far ahead of its time, the symbiosis of motorsport qualities and production features creating an ideal grand touring car. On public roads Type 64 reached a top speed of no less than 130 km/h or 81 mph. Ferdinand Porsche often drove this car himself, showing his deep satisfaction by presenting the Porsche family name on the car itself. Story by Porsche AG Driving the 1938 Porsche Type 64K10

 via youtube.com

The Porsche 64, also known as the VW Aerocoupe, Type 64 and Type 60K10, is considered by many to be the first automobile from what was to become the Porsche company, as a true design precursor to the production model of after the war. The model number comes from the fact that it was built mainly from design drawings for the Type-64 “record car”. Most mechanical parts came from the 38 prototype series. The chassis was heavily reinforced and the engine also reworked to produce around 45-50 brake horse power. The Type-64 was only a drawing until the three racers were built.

The body was also a compromise in that the cab had to look like a KdF car, but the rest was ‘record’ car. The VW beetle was the Type-60, and the name the “60K10” means body design 10 for the Type-60 Beetle. Its flat-four engine produced 50 bhp and gave a top speed of around 160 km/h (99 mph). The body design was made by the Porsche Büro after wind tunnel tests for a planned V10 sports car that never came into existence, the Type 114. Dr. Porsche promoted the idea to enter the car into the 1939 Berlin-Rome race as a public relations ploy. Three cars were made in hand shaped aluminum by the bodywork company Reutter.

Porsche Typ 60 K 10 – Porsche Typ 64 Berlin-Rom 1939…from kitchener.lord Source-MotorKlassik

One was destroyed early in World War II. The two remaining were used by the Porsche family.  Eventually they only used one of them and put the other in storage.  In May 1945 American troops discovered the one put in storage, cut the roof off and used it for joyriding for a few weeks until the engine gave up and it was scrapped.

The last remaining Porsche 64 was owned by Ferry Porsche who had it restored by Battista Farina in 1947. In 1949 it was sold to the Austrian motorcycle racer Otto Mathé and with it he won the Alpine Rally in 1950. The last time he drove it in a race was at the Monterey Historic Races in Monterey, California, in 1982.

 
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Posted by on March 16, 2010 in Porsche, Porsche Type 64

 

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