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VIDEO: TWO BOYS EXPERIENCE AT THE PORSCHE MUSEUM IN STUTTGART, THE WORLD OF SPORTS CARS

real deal.Standbild069

DREAMING? Fond of PORSCHES?
What if YOU could be ALL alone 1 NIGHT @ the PORSCHE MUSEUM? What would YOU want to SEE? …or sit in?
Two high-tech kids sneak inside the Porsche-Museum, …anything is possible.

Michael Köckritz, creative director and editor in chief of ramp tells this story in this shortcut. Simple and direct, ramp Auto.Kultur.Magazin
Song: The coast of French Cornwall composed, performed and recorded by David Ducaruge @ KMA19 Studios.
Executive Video Producer: CHRISTOPHER KIPPENBERGER 
DOP: Marcus Gelhard 
Creative Consultant: THEEMOTIONALFRIEND

 

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Porsche Design TwinBag, Finest craftsmanship, down to the very last detail

TwinBag in green ostrich leather

TwinBag in green ostrich leather

Porsche Design TwinBag

Stuttgart. The luxury brand’s first women’s handbag will be available from March 1st in all Porsche Design Stores around the world and in the official online store. The TwinBag is distinguished by its unique design and exclusive leather materials, expertly crafted by workers in Florence.

Finest Craftsmanship

Finest Craftsmanship

The main highlight is the bag’s clever carrying concept: its adjustable handles allow the TwinBag to be worn as either a handbag or a shoulder bag. The German luxury brand’s first handbag rounds off its fashion and lifestyle range for women.

Finest Craftsmanship

Finest Craftsmanship

Italian craftsmanship shines through in every detail of the TwinBag, making it a true masterpiece. Produced from a single piece of calf leather, the bag is painstakingly stitched by hand in an intricate production process.

Finest Craftsmanship

Finest Craftsmanship

Its Italian production ensures the finest workmanship and particular attention to detail – the handbag benefits from knowledge and tradition passed down through generations of Florentine craft workers.

Finest Craftsmanship

Finest Craftsmanship

The Porsche Design TwinBag is one of the most exclusive bags around this season. Premium quality was a key focus in the selection of materials. The leather is tanned using an ecological process, the lining is made from soft Alcantara and the metal fittings are finished using an elaborate electroplating procedure.

Finest Craftsmanship

Finest Craftsmanship

After vegetable tanning, the selected leather varieties – exclusive ostrich leather, elegant crocodile leather and modern calf leather – are processed with the highest precision and utmost attention to quality.

An elaborate electroplating process is used to produce six different finishes for the timeless metal fittings which are then polished by hand. The fittings are made from precious metals, such as gold, white gold, rose gold, matt gold, silver and chrome.

Finest Craftsmanship

Finest Craftsmanship

The many different combinations of fine leather varieties and finishes result in a very distinctive look for each TwinBag model.

Finest Craftsmanship

Finest Craftsmanship

The highlight of the first TwinBag collection is a grey crocodile leather bag with white gold fittings.

TwinBag in blue ostrich leather

TwinBag in blue ostrich leather

Gold details adorn the green and blue ostrich leather bags, while the grey leather bag sports chromeblack metal fittings.

TwinBag in grey crocodile leather

TwinBag in grey crocodile leather

The individual numbers on the crocodile and ostrich leather versions further emphasise their exclusivity. The collection is rounded off with a total of 13 stylish and modern calf leather versions. The TwinBag colour spectrum ranges from elegant white to timeless beige and classic black.

Featuring a two-way zip for easy access, the interior of the TwinBag is designed with functionality in mind: it is roomy enough to hold DIN A4-size documents and a 13-inch laptop.

TwinBag in grey ostrich leather

TwinBag in grey ostrich leather

Additional information can be found on http://www.porsche-design.com/TwinBag

Cost: Well, the bags, which are produced in Florence, Italy and range from $1,990 to $11,900 CAD (note: special order handbags top out at just under $30,000), will be available in March 2013 in all Porsche Design stores and online.

Crocodile, with 18K white gold hardware, handbag $29,000, by special order.

Source: Porsche Design Media Database

 

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40 Years of Porsche Design – Special exhibition at the Porsche Museum

The world’s first black timepiece, and at the same time luxury brand Porsche Design’s first product: The “Chronoprapgh I”.

40 Years of Porsche Design

 

Stuttgart. The world’s first black timepiece, the legendary exclusive spectacles and the Porsche 911 – for decades, all these products have stood for a unique design by Ferdinand Alexander Porsche: In 1972 he founded the “Porsche Design Studio” in Stuttgart, the head office of which was relocated to Zell am See in Austria in 1974.

Starting today, the Porsche Museum is marking the company’s 40th anniversary with a special exhibition: from 13 November 2012 to 17 February 2013, visitors can experience the most important, most interesting and most extraordinary products as well as how Porsche Design came to exist.

40 Years of Porsche Design

The focus of the anniversary exhibition is on the “Porsche Design” brand, which in recent years has been developed into one of the world’s leading luxury brands with its own sales network. F.A. Porsche designed numerous classic men’s accessories such as watches, spectacles and writing implements, which achieved worldwide recognition under the “Porsche Design” brand. In parallel, with his team, he designed a plethora of industrial products, household appliances and consumer durables for internationally renowned clients under the “Design by F.A. Porsche” brand. Ferdinand Alexander Porsche won numerous honours and awards for his work as a designer.

40 Years of Porsche Design

For example, the “Chronograph I”, a milestone in the watchmaker’s craft, is a compulsory exhibition piece. The world’s first black timepiece, and at the same time luxury brand Porsche Design’s first product, created a furore in 1972 because the automatic chronograph – considered unthinkable at the time – was designed in matt black throughout and provocatively unadorned. With this chronometer, F.A. Porsche was anticipating a trend that is part and parcel of today’s watch industry and even then was considered to be revolutionary. In addition to the chronograph, the visitor will also be presented with other products from the accessories and spectacles range. For example the Porsche Design P’8478 exclusive spectacles will be on display, already purchased by more than 7 million wearers. Writing implements and pipes will also feature in the exhibition.

The adjustable “Antropovarius” lounge chair is also on display as the “Alternative Motorcycle Concept”, AMK.

A highlight of the special exhibition is the grand piano, which the Porsche Design Studio designed for the Bösendorfer piano factory in 2003. This grand piano symbolises the studio’s design output, characterised by a clear, functional design language, meticulous choice of materials and top quality workmanship. The adjustable “Antropovarius” lounge chair developed by the Porsche Design Studio in 1982 in collaboration with the Institute of Ergonomics of the University of Munich will also be on display as will the “Alternative Motorcycle Concept”, AMK, devised in 1980 as an alternative solution to the car and to conventional motorcycles.

The Porsche Museum is marking the company’s 40th anniversary with a special exhibition from 13 November 2012 to 17 February 2013.

In addition to a selection of special design developments, the visitor will also gain an insight into the everyday creative life of Porsche Design’s employees. This is where those who are interested will discover not just the individual steps in creating the product – from conceiving the idea through to design – but also the sources of inspiration. For example, in the case of the pipe, it is explained that when it came to the cooling ribs, F.A. Porsche took his lead from air-cooled single cylinder motorcycle engines. The Porsche museum also looks back at the life’s work and man that was F.A. Porsche, who created legendary cars such as the 904 Carrera GTS and Porsche 911. In the process the visitor will find out things such as why in 1974 F.A. Porsche decided to locate the Design Studio in Zell am See.

At 3 p.m. on Wednesdays and Sundays, the visitor has the opportunity to experience the special exhibition in the course of a one hour themed tour.

The Porsche Museum is using the anniversary exhibition as an opportunity to extend its tour programme. At 3 p.m. on Wednesdays and Sundays, the visitor has the opportunity to experience the special exhibition in the course of a one hour themed tour at a price of four euro per person. The Store at the Porsche Centre in Stuttgart Zuffenhausen also offers a ten per cent discount on Porsche Design products upon presentation of the museum entrance ticket.

The volume “Porsche Design 40Y – The Book” is also being published in time for the anniversary, available in both German and English for 98 euro in the Porsche Museum shop as well as in book stores. In the course of more than 570 pages, the reader is acquainted with an insight into the history of Porsche Design.

The Porsche Museum is open Tuesday to Sunday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is eight euro for adults and four euro for concessions. Further information is available on the Internet at http://www.porsche.com/museum.

SOURCE: Porsche AG Media Database

Communication Porsche AG
Porsche Museum

 

 

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Porsche’s Secret Studebaker Identified on the Drawing Board as Porsche Project Type 542

The Studebaker/Porsche Project

Is that the Studebaker Porsche Project Type 542 under that cover at the Porsche Design Studio? 


After Ferdinand Porsche died, his son Ferry was asked by the Studebaker Company, to design a new car. Porsche suggested a 4 cylinder 1.500 cc coupe, rear engine car but that was not accepted by Studebaker, which wanted a 6 cylinder, much larger car with a front engine. Earlier in the 1950s Studebaker entered into serious discussions with Porsche regarding the German company developing a compact car for the South Bend firm.

Anxious to expand its presence in the U.S. and prodded by Volkswagen importer Max Hoffman, Porsche worked up a design proposal that it dubbed the Type 542, a rear-engined, four-door sedan somewhat smaller than Studebaker’s Champion.

Porsche produced a running protype and sent it to South Bend for evaluation.  Distracted by its financial problems, Studebaker didn’t take a serious look at the prototype until 1956 when the company’s director of experimental engineering, John Z. DeLorean, gave it a thumbs-down and the project was DOA.

 Yes, that would be the same John DeLorean who later built his OWN sports car and, whatever his other failings, DeLorean was, by all accounts, a brilliant engineer. He was also an American in an era when American car people tended to give short shrift to ideas that ran contrary to prevailing practices in Detroit. In this vein, DeLorean’s report was highly critical of everything about the Porsche prototype that was distinctively European:

“Some excessive vertical shake was noted…There still remains considerable lateral movement and rear-end steering, with undesirable amounts of oversteer noted in moderate to hard cornering. There is uneven tire wear…The car steers quickly, but hard, and requires constant attention and correction for road wander. Cross-winds and slippery spots make driving tedious and rather dangerous..

“The radiator, grille, hood and deck slopes are quite steep and not in keeping with current American boxy-styling. The car is full width but rather short…It appears small and bug-like due to the sloping hood and squeezed-in rear fender treatment…

“This vehicle has a large amount of technical appeal, but a number of items need refinement to increase its overall appeal as a small car to the average American car buyer…The 1956 Champion or Commander is preferred to the Porsche [Z-87] for American driving…”

Turning Wheels, February 1977

In 1952 Porsche begins the project and after 18 months the prototype was ready to be tested. Labeled as Porsche Project 542. Karl Rabe was the chief engineer.


Porsche proposed a 6V rear engine four door as shown in picture below. It was to have a 2,82 m wheelbase, independent suspension and was to try two different cooling systems, one air-cooled, another composite air-water, named internally the 542L ( L from Luft=Air in German) and the 542W (W from Wasser=water in German) 90×80 mm

Studebaker – Porsche Project 542. Karl Rabe was the chief engineer.


These were rated as follows: 
The air cooled version weighted 220KG, and had an output of 98 HP at 3700 rpm. 
The water cooled version weighed 206 KG had an output 106 HP at 3500 rpm.

Above: The air and water cooled engine.

Below: The final water-cooled engine.

Above: A Studebaker sketch for a small car. Note rear air intake fins.


They both were tested in Europe and Porsche traveled to USA in 1954 with four prototypes, two of each engine type. When he arrived, Studebaker had been bought by Packard and the new firm was not interested in the project.

Turning Wheels, February 1977

Turning Wheels, February 1977

Turning Wheels, February 1977


That was the end of the Studebaker/Porsche.

 Porsche also proposed a compact car much like the “square-back” Volkswagen that was built in the latter 1960s. It, too, failed to spark much interest in South Bend and that the end of the fruitless relationship between Porsche and Studebaker.

Shortly after this episode, Studebaker entered into agreements with aircraft manufacturer Curtiss-Wright over a variety of management and manufacturing issues, one upshot of which was that Curtiss-Wright would take over management of Studebaker for a period of time.  In 1959 Curtiss-Wright engineers, for reasons known only to them, bought a Studebaker Lark from a dealer, removed the entire drive train and installed a 1953 Porsche boxer engine, suspension and transaxle in the rear of the car.

Whatever their reasons for cobbling together this prototype, the project went nowhere, Curtiss-Wright soon divorced itself from Studebaker and the pride of South Bend continued down the road to extinction.

An excerpt from “www.studegarage.com/porsche.htm” ( Link below)In February, 1959 Curtis-Wright bought a new Lark with a Champ 6 engine from a local dealer and modified it. A used engine from a 1953 Porsche was rebuilt by Porsche and installed along with the torsion-bar rear suspension and transaxle. Wheels and gear reduction boxes from a VW bus were used to optimize the drive line. This engine was placed in what had been the trunk of the Lark after removing the Champ 6 and automatic transmission from the front of the car. In addition, since Curtis-Wright had taken out a license to build Wankel rotary engines, an adapter was prepared to install a small Wankel engine in place of the Porsche engine. This car may have been the prototype for the sub-compact touted two years later.Before the car could be fully tested and the rotary engine installed, the relationship between Curtis-Wright and Studebaker ended. The Lark was sold to a local New Jersey garage, then quickly resold twice more to car collectors. The car still survives and has occasionally appeared at car shows in New England. It retains the 1500 cc, 70 hp Porsche engine in the trunk. While the horsepower rating is less than the Champ 6 it replaced, the much lower weight of the Porsche engine and transmission help, but it is not a high-performance car. The engine produces peak horsepower at 5,000 rpm. 

Images from the Studebaker Museum, May 2007

Studebaker’s that never were

 1961 studebaker prototypeIn March, 1961 Studebaker released a sketch of a sub-compact car planned for future introduction.  It called for a four-cylinder, air-cooled, rear engine of 65-75 horsepower.  Wheelbase was about 100 inches, much shorter than the Lark of the time.  Seating was for four or five passengers.  Studebaker hoped to get the car to market by the fall of 1962 at a price under $2000.   The car never made it to production, but there was more to it than just an artist’s sketch.   It was known as a Porsche Type 633, the result of an association with Porsche that started in 1952.studebaker porsche type 633
Porsche built a car for Studebaker in August, 1952 with a 120-degree V-6 engine .   This was the Porsche Type 542, also known as the Z-87 car at Studebaker.   Though it was looked at then, it didn’t get serious review until 1956 when Studebaker’s director of experimental engineering tested the car and reported on it.   The director’s name: John Z. DeLorean, who later went on to other cars and other activities.  He didn’t like the Porsche effort and compared it unfavorably to the comfort and ride of the 1956 Champion and Commander.  Interestingly, this appears to have been the only 4-door Porsche until the Cayenne SUV was introduced for 2003.In later years, a Lark was modified to have a Porsche engine and transaxle installed in the trunk area.  Curtis-Wright Corporation owned nearly half of the Studebaker stock in the late 1950’s and took over management of the company.   Development efforts were conducted at their New Jersey facility.

1959 Studebaker Lark w Porsche engine
In February, 1959 Curtis-Wright bought a new Lark with a Champ 6 engine from a local dealer and modified it.  A used engine from a 1953 Porsche was rebuilt by Porsche and installed along with the torsion-bar rear suspension and transaxle.  Wheels and gear reduction boxes from a VW bus were used to optimize the drive line.  This engine was placed in what had been the trunk of the Lark after removing the Champ 6 and automatic transmission from the front of the car.  In addition, since Curtis-Wright had taken out a license to build Wankel rotary engines, an adapter was prepared to install a small Wankel engine in place of the Porsche engine.  This car may have been the prototype for the sub-compact touted two years later.
Before the car could be fully tested and the rotary engine installed, the relationship between Curtis-Wright and Studebaker ended.  The Lark was sold to a local New Jersey garage, then quickly resold twice more to car collectors.  The car still survives and has occasionally appeared at car shows in New England.  It retains the 1500 cc, 70 hp Porsche engine in the trunk.  While the horsepower rating is less than the Champ 6 it replaced, the much lower weight of the Porsche engine and transmission help, but it is not a high-performance car.  The engine produces peak horsepower at 5,000 rpm.

 

(A detailed discussion of Porsche’s involvement with Studebaker can be found here.)

More added here

Source:  Studebaker/Porsche Project http://oldcarandtruckpictures.com/Studebaker/TheEnd.html

 Karl Ludvigsen outlined in SIA #24, September-October 1974. Studebaker’s first involvement with Porsche came earlier in the 1950s, in an earlier attempt to build a compact car. Porsche’s engineers came up with several designs and even whipped up a prototype car and a pair of prototype engines. The exact connection between that prototype and the later experimental car, however, remains unknown.

SIA-StudeByPorsche_01_225.jpgSIA-StudeByPorsche_02_225.jpg

SIA-StudeByPorsche_03_225.jpg SIA-StudeByPorsche_04_225.jpg

While the American firm struggled on, the project had supplied a good deal of funding to Porsche when they needed it most. While Studebaker and Packard were closing factories, Porsche was building new ones. Studebaker-Packard did manage to get a piece of the late 1950s imported car market eventually though – they became the American importers of Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union before exiting the auto industry all together in the mid 1960s. (Imagine what Max Hoffman must have thought.) The rest, as they say, is history.

Much research credit must be given to Karl Ludvigsen’s articles on this topic from the mid-1970s.

 

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Video: It’s Official, Porsche Engineering Purchased the “Nardò Testing Ring”

The Nardo Ring

Porsche Nardo Ring

Porsche Nardo Ring

Something we all didn’t expect to stumble upon today: On 11 April 2012, the famed Nardò Technical Center with its high-speed ring in southern Italy will soon have a new owner as the Porsche Engineering Group announced that it would take over the facility from its current landlord Prototipo SpA in May. Italy’s famed high speed test track, located at more than 20 kilometres  (12 mi) north-west of the town of NardòItaly, in the southern region of Apulia, in the province of Lecce.

Neither Porsche nor the track’s former owner, Italy’s Prototipo SpA, will say how much the deal went for, we can only guess. Porsche has been a regular at the circuit, along with other manufacturers.

Nardo Ring, Italy

Nardo Ring, Italy
The Nardo Ring is a striking visual feature from space, and astronauts have photographed it several times. The Ring is a race car test track that is steeply banked to reduce the amount of active steering needed by drivers. The Ring lies in a remote area on the heel of Italy's "boot," east of the naval port of Taranto and encompasses a number of active (green) and fallow (brown to dark brown) agricultural fields. In this zone of intensive agriculture, farmers gain access to their fields through the Ring via a series of underpasses. Winding features within the southern section of the Ring appear to be smaller, unused race tracks.
Image Credit: NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

The automotive proving ground that can be seen from space covers an area of more than 700 hectares and comprises a 6.2-kilometer (3.9 miles) long handling circuit, a 12.5-kilometer (7.8 miles) long oval circuit and facilities for simulating different road surfaces and changeable weather condition.

“The Nardò proving ground with its high-speed and vehicle handling circuit ideally complements our facilities in Weissach,” said Matthias Müller, President and CEO of Porsche AG.

“With the systematic development of the company in Nardò as part of Strategy 2018, Porsche is proving to be a reliable employer and business partner in Apulia as well.”

 

Porsche said that it plans to optimize the test facilities and make them available to its clients for testing and trials purposes.

“With its rich array of facilities, from dynamic surfaces to acoustic and off-road sections coupled with the numerous workshops, our clients can continue to make extensive use of Nardò for their vehicle trials in the future as well,” said Malte Radmann, CEO of Porsche Engineering.

Thanks to the mild Mediterranean weather, the track can be used throughout the year in three shifts around the clock, seven days a week.

The ring is banked to such a degree that, on the track’s outer lane, cars can travel 150 miles per hour. Presumably, that’s what Porsche will be doing with it—that, and loan it out to their co-members of the VW Group. We’re guessing Lamborghini and other brands will want to spend as much time there as they can.

Most of us are aware that Porsche is developing their next supercar model which is the 918 Spyder and it will be the world’s first hybrid supercar. Porsche has built three prototypes until now and recently, the German automaker invited the guys from Wired magazine to test drive one of them on the Nardo Ring high speed test track in Italy this last March..

Porsche 918 Prototype testing at Nardo Ring

Porsche 918 Prototype testing at Nardo Ring

The car may not look much or complete right now but it was in bits and pieces a few weeks ago and Porsche managed to assign a team to assemble the parts in time for the test drive on the Nardo Ring.

Porsche will use the Nardo Ring to test future models and rent to other makers for development

Porsche will use the Nardo Ring to test future models and rent to other makers for development

The track is 12.5 kilometres (7.8 mi) long and is round, has four lanes for cars and motorcycles totaling 16 metres (52 ft) in width and has a separate inner ring for trucks at a width of 9 metres (30 ft).

In the cars/motorcycle ring the lanes are banked at such a degree that a driver in the outer most lane need not turn the wheel while driving at speeds of up to 240 km/h (149 mph). In essence, at the so called neutral speed which is different for the four lanes, one can drive as if in a straight lane. However extremely fast cars still require the steering wheel to be turned when going faster than the maximum neutral speed.

For example the Koenigsegg CCRwhich set a speed record for a production car at the Nardò Ring did so with the steering wheel at a 30° angle. This speed record has since been beaten by the Bugatti Veyron at Volkswagen Group‘s private Ehra-Lessien straight line test track in Germany, and hence the CCR only holds the speed record for the Nardò Ring.

An example of a Highspeed racing in Italy on the Nardo racetrack 

In the process of fighting a turn as needed when going faster than the neutral speed quite a bit of potential top speed is lost and hence a fast car will go faster in a straight line than what is possible on the Nardó Ring.

Even at the neutral speed in a banked turn a car runs a bit heavier than it would in a straight line, since the downforce created by the banking increases the rolling resistance on the tires. There has only been one fatality at the ring.

The neutral speed for the four car/motorcycle lanes are respectively:

  • Lane 1 – 100 km/h (62 mph)

  • Lane 2 – 140 km/h (87 mph)

  • Lane 3 – 190 km/h (118 mph)

  • Lane 4 – 240 km/h (149 mph)

During regular weekly working activity the maximum speed allowed on the circular track is 240 km/h (149 mph). Higher speeds are only allowed at times when a client gets the track for its exclusive use.

The neutral speed for the truck ring is between 80 km/h (50 mph) and 140 km/h (87 mph) over the width of the track, highest in the outer most part of the lane.

Sources: Porsche AG and  Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

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Warpaint: The Graphic Design of Racing Cars

Warpaint: The Graphic Design of Racing Cars

Go Faster by Sven Voelker gives deep insight into racing-car graphic design

You’d never guess it, but these big toys for big boys were at the height of their design.
Mechanics and team members – adorned racecars with all of those flashy stripes, logos, numbers and colors prevalent race today.
A whip-fast lesson in competitive “WAR PAINT”, visual anarchy and car designs.
They were to LOOK dangerous and be the WINNER.
This video provides a very interesting look at the design of racing cars in 70s. The graphics on these cars are incredible — very minimal and nothing at all like the logo-plastered cars of NASCAR.

Go Faster is a book by a German university professor, Sven Voelker giving the clear insight into the glory of racing-car graphic design.

This book makes car fans familiar with the fact that most of the racing cars like Porsche and Ferrari were given looks not by marketing strategists or designers, but by chance.

Go Faster –The Graphic Design of Racing Cars

by Sven Voelker

bookAdditionalPackshotsImage

 

Go Faster is a collection of over one hundred examples of racecar design that documents the carefree anarchy in which they were created. In the book, each colorful racing car is featured next to a blank, white model.
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
Thanks to this juxtaposition, Go Faster shows its readers exactly how graphics modulate the look of the vehicle.
The neutral models also give readers ample opportunity to imagine their own possibilities for graphic design in motor sports.
This makes the book an ideal gift for anyone interested in racing and high speeds.

go faster

Stripes, numbers, colors, and logos – the graphic visual look of a racecar has to stand out from all the others as they go zooming by.
Most people don’t know that racing cars from the likes of Porsche, Ferrari, Maserati, and Lotus were given their looks not by marketing strategists or designers, but by pure chance.
Go Faster is a collection of over one hundred examples of racecar design that documents the carefree anarchy in which they were created.
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
In the book, colorful racing cars are featured next to blank, white models.
Thanks to this juxtaposition, Go Faster not only takes its readers on a breakneck ride through images of racing history, but also shows them exactly how the graphics modulate the look of the vehicle.
bookAdditionalImage
The neutral models in the book also give readers ample opportunity to imagine their own possibilities for graphic design in motor sports.
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
bookAdditionalPackshotsImage
The time and effort invested in the look of racecars is strangely out of balance compared to that used to shape the bodywork or engineer the technology present in the car.
But perhaps it is precisely this amateur quality, this anarchy and randomness that results in the irresistible attraction that racing cars and their graphics have on us.
bookAdditionalImage
There are, of course, countless books on racing cars, but Go Faster is the first to focus on the graphic design of these machines.
This makes the book an ideal gift for anyone interested in racing and high speeds.Sven Voelker
http://www.svenvoelker.com/Sven_Voelker.html
is a car enthusiast and graphic designer in Berlin.
He is responsible for the global corporate design of the Suzuki Motor Corporation and other clients.

go faster1go faster2go faster3go faster4go faster5

Via:Gestalten

This book with 144 pages and 21 × 26cm format was release on January 2010 and is priced at $ 40, 00. The book is the collection of more than hundred examples on race car design, documenting the carefree anarchy which these vehicles were created in.

At the same time, the book not only gives the readers a chance to know how graphics modulate the look of the vehicle but also the opportunities to imagine their own possibilities for graphic design in motor sports.

Go Faster gives meticulous attention to minutest details and discusses how the numbers, stripes, logos and colours in vehicle are not a willy nilly affair but purposefully placed by the designer team. Well, this book comes out to be a perfect gift for the racing nerds and car freaks.

While the go-faster stripe is a classic design element of the racing car, the look of these vehicles is rarely created by a designer. Sven Voelker looks at the unexplored area of fast and furious graphic art in the new book,…….

bookAdditionalImage

Go Faster…

The Graphic Design of Racing Cars
Release Date:
January 2010
ISBN:
978-3-89955-279-9
Authors:
Sven Voelker
http://www.svenvoelker.com/Sven_Voelker.html
Language:
English
Features:
144 Pages, full color, hardcover
Format:
21 × 26 cm
 
1 Comment

Posted by on November 16, 2010 in Autos & Vehicles

 

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