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9:11 Magazine. Episode 3. Quality. (The 1M 911, Le Mans, Project Luna, Porsche Quality Center, 930.)

Episode 3 of 9:11 Magazine is dedicated to quality, which has always been a part of the Porsche legend. Witness the production of the one-millionth 911 and visit the Porsche Quality Center. 

Porsche also delivers exciting views from behind the scenes in preparation for Le Mans, drive in a Porsche Turbo through the Canadian wilderness, and take a closer look at a special anecdote: “Project Luna.” 

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Posted by on August 20, 2017 in Porsche

 

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Video: Porsche Sport Driving School, training is just the ticket for any Porsche enthusiast.

Date: 28.07.–29.07.2015

Master at Circuit de Spa-Francorchamps

One of the most fascinating racetracks in the world.

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Training Level: Master. Two day course for advanced participants.

This course is perfect for any Porsche enthusiast who has successfully completed several training courses at the Porsche Sport Driving School. You can look forward to continuing to hone your skills with other experienced participants. Under the guidance of experienced professionals. Included in the programme: a Porsche works driver, and our instructors, all of whom are experienced in racing.

Participation in high-performance vehicles is not essential, but highly recommended.

You are already an accomplished driver, so we don’t need to cover the basics. Instead, we can focus on showing you how to drive more independently and quickly find your way around the track without the aid of cones and instructors. Naturally, this also includes identifying and following the racing line. You’ll also discover how this can be developed still further.

Training is conducted in small groups and performance is analysed using video and data recordings.

You’ll also have plenty of time out on the track to put what you’ve learned into practice and continue to improve your skills – you’ll even receive one-to-one guidance on some laps of the circuit.

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In addition, a workshop covering both theoretical and practical aspects will teach you all you need to know about the chassis and tyres to enable you to transfer the power of your vehicle to the road in the most efficient way. Another highlight: the passenger rides in a Porsche 911 GT3 Cup(subject to availability).

More information about Porsche trainings plus dates and prices can be found online at:

 www.porsche.com/sportdrivingschool

Link Website:

https://drivingexperience.porsche.com/en/sport-driving-school/events-and-services/training-levels-onroad/master/spa-francorchamps

 

Porsche Sport Driving School

Operator: _wige EVENT gmbh

Stammheimer Straße 31

70435 Stuttgart

Tel.: +49 (0) 711 911-23364

Fax: +49 (0) 711 911-23277

E-Mail: info@porschesportdrivingschool.de

 

 
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Posted by on July 6, 2015 in Porsche

 

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New Porsche Classic Radio Navigation System

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The purpose-built unit combines the style of yesteryear with the benefits of modern technology. It fits perfectly into the DIN-1 slot that has been used in the sports cars for decades and is operated by means of two knobs, six discreetly integrated buttons and a touch-sensitive 3.5-inch display.

Classic on the outside yet ultra modern on the inside: the Porsche Classic Radio Navigation System.

It is suitable for all classic Porsche cars with a DIN-1 slot. From the 911 F-model, to the 911 type 993, and for both four and eight-cylinder vehicles (excluding the Porsche 356).
This short video clip points out the most important USPs: Map-Navigation, phone calls via bluetooth, the use of the USB port and perfect fitting into the dashboard.

Thanks to the appearance of the black surface and the shape of the knobs, which are supplied in two authentically styled versions as standard, the navigation radio blends harmoniously into the dashboard of classic Porsche models. It bears the Porsche lettering and is suitable for the sports car generations between the first 911 from the 1960s and the last of the 911 series with air cooling from the mid 1990s (993 series), including the earlier front-engine and mid-engine models.

Exclusively developed and adapted for classic Porsche sports cars

The new navigation radio comes with all the key features of today’s systems. In addition to low-interference radio reception and precise navigation, it has interfaces for a variety of external music sources that can be controlled from the display. A smartphone can be connected via Bluetooth. In addition, the classic radio not only has a built-in microphone but also comes with an external microphone. The integrated amplifier delivers 4×45 watts and can be connected either directly to the loudspeakers or to the original sound system using an optional adapter cable.

Porsche Cayenne GTS Cayenne Turbo S

The navigation radio by Porsche Classic

The new navigation radio has been exclusively developed for Porsche Classic and specially for the classic sports cars. Radio reception, for instance, has been optimised for the built-in aerial supplied ex-works, which is generally only a single telescope. The operating concept of the device is based on Porsche Communication Management (PCM) and has undergone extensive testing at the Technical University in Munich to verify its user friendliness.

Numerous trial journeys have been undertaken in Europe to test the country-specific navigation. Drivers have a choice of arrows and two-dimensional or three-dimensional maps to display the route. The maps are stored on a microSD card with eight gigabytes of memory and are updated regularly. In Germany, the new navigation radio is available immediately from Porsche Classic Partners or Centres and costs 1,184 euros including VAT.

Porsche Classic combines tradition and innovation of modern and vintage cars

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Porsche Classic is a division of the sports car manufacturer responsible for the maintenance of vehicles which were generally produced more than ten years ago. Its services cover all aspects of care and technical literature as well as the supply and reproduction of original parts and even extend to complete restoration. The company is expanding its international dealer and service network to around 100 Porsche Classic Partners for the optimal support and overhaul of classic cars in the next years.

Porsche customers and potential customers can expect the complete range of Porsche Classic services from the partners. Through this measure, Porsche has integrated the care and value retention of modern classic and vintage cars in an innovative service concept, closely linking Porsche tradition and Porsche innovation.

Source: Communication Porsche AG
Product Communication

 

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Best grip thanks to modern tyres – even for classic Porsche cars

New tyre approval lists published following extensive tests with classic Porsche models

Stuttgart. Drivers of classic Porsche sports cars can now find the new lists with all tyres approved by Porsche for download on the Porsche Classic website. These tyre approval lists represent the results of extensive tests over several weeks carried out by the Porsche tyre experts this summer. They used classic Porsche sports cars and modern classics such as a 356, a 911 Carrera G model, a 911 Turbo (930) and a first generation Porsche Boxster (986) for these tests.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356, 911 Carrera G-Modell, first generation Boxster

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356, 911 Carrera G-Modell, first generation Boxster

Such tests take place on a regular basis to test and approve newly developed tyres for classic Porsche cars. The approval is also documented by the so-called N marking on the tyre flank.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Porsche is the only manufacturer that performs such an extensive service for older models, ranging from those 356 models that are over 50 years old, through all the 911 generations and the transaxle models 924/944/968 and 928, right up to the first Boxster (986). This is justifiable as around two thirds of all Porsche sports cars ever built are still driving more or less regularly on our roads.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

With these tyre tests for classic sports cars, Porsche ensures that these older models also profit from the progress made in tyre development and can take advantage of the modern tyres that are tailored to meet their requirements. This benefits driving behaviour and driving safety with regards to grip on wet roads and shorter braking distances.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

The latest lists with the new tyres added this year can be downloaded from the Internet using this link:
http://www.porsche.com/germany/accessoriesandservices/classic/galleryanddownloads/downloads/

Continue reading the following pages to find out how these tyre tests take place and what else need to be considered with respect to tyres for classic Porsche sports cars.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Porsche tests new tyres for sports cars up to 65 years old
As around two thirds of all Porsche models ever built are still in driving condition, Porsche takes a lot of effort to look after these older models. You can see this from the format that is used for the tyre approval for older models: Currently, there are 183 recommendations, just for the right summer tyres, for those models built between 1949 and 2005. Another 126 recommendations apply to winter tyres.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: modern tyres preserve driving pleasure and driving safety

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: modern tyres preserve driving pleasure and driving safety

All these approvals are usually updated every two years through ongoing tests. The reason for all this effort is obvious: As the manufacturer, Porsche cannot abandon owners with regards to the right tyre types, because many owners are still lovingly taking care of and driving their Porsche models that reach back into the fifties and sixties. Independent tyre businesses, if faced with a 1963 Porsche 356 and tyre format 185/70 R 15, would for instance probably use those tyre types that are generally available for the remaining VW Beetle population and the various Transporter models.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: extensive testing by Porsche tyre experts

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: extensive testing by Porsche tyre experts

However, special tyre approvals for new Porsche models already applied in the past, and these were practically always based on special development steps by the tyre manufacturer and specifically designed for Porsche. Selecting a new set of tyres for a 356 model on the basis of “only size matters” would therefore essentially be a mistake. The beautiful vintage car would not be radically unfit to drive in most cases, but the original skill of such a car for a safe road stance and playful handling would be pretty much left at the road side. Maybe not when dry, but fairly probably when the road was wet. Such incorrect choices are why Porsche has carried out the latest tyre tests.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Oldsters can be dashing too
To avoid dramatic errors, new tyre models are tested and processed for approval for all the older car models. The Porsche Museum and Porsche Classic are always delighted to open up their fleets and send the cars out onto the test track. In this way, robust test drives take place on the test grounds of Contidrom near Hanover using those Porsche models that already have a few decades tucked under their elegantly designed bonnets. Porsche Classic adopts the recommendations of the tyre test specialists who, particularly in the case of Dieter Röscheisen, can look back over a few dozen years of tyre testing experience. He therefore stands on a level playing field with his classic format test cars and is usually just as fast when on the go.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Because tyre testing also means driving at the limit in a controlled manner. The disciplines of dry and wet handling are of paramount interest, while brake testing and aquaplaning tests round off the test program. The entire test program is aimed at precisely measuring how the tyres behave up to the limits. Every facet of behaviour, from the initial steering movement to the exit of the bend, is precisely analysed and logged for each set of tyres in the test. The car turning cleanly into the bend is just the first step towards approval. Well-controlled behaviour under high transverse acceleration is obligatory, and exiting bends must be mastered without any discontinuous loss of road adherence.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

A harmonious performance is paramount
The tests always comprise several rounds on the test track, which is rich in curves, and precisely determined lap times are used for comparative purposes. A tyre must deliver performance at its limits in a predictable and balanced manner to obtain a good evaluation. The same applies understandably to the front and rear axles as this is only way to get good marks and the prospect of approval for the historic vehicle series.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

The marking that turns tyres in a historically valuable dimension into Porsche tyres is therefore a type of quality seal: Those tyre models recommended by Porsche bear the mark “N” on the tyre flank, always in combination with a number (N0, N1, N2, etc.). This “N” has for decades been the hallmark for the special tyre designs developed for Porsche. Naturally, it would have been nice at the time to be able to select “P” or “Po” for Porsche. But the international development of the tyre standards led to N being chosen as the unmistakable mark for the selected approval by Porsche and that is how it stands today. The experts all know, the “N” belongs to Porsche when it comes to tyres.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

The corresponding number after the “N” is solely used to differentiate the approval series. Example: The first version of a tyre with the dimension 195/65 R 15 was approved with the mark N0 for the applicable Carrera series in the seventies. When a new series of the same tyre, manufacture and type is designed and approved for production as replacement parts, the tyre is assigned the next higher auxiliary number – in this case 1 – to differentiate it from the previous series.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Keyword tyre ageing
This particularly critical aspect was also tested during the latest test series in summer 2014. This effect mainly plays a role when a vehicle with a long history is only rarely driven and spends more time standing than driving. The tyres visibly become more brittle, the traction and level of grip decrease. The word “undriveable” may not apply directly if such a tyre is just over five years old. But the capability for a smooth driving style, which may have characterised it at one point, decreases steadily with increasing age in all cases. If you take a look at the so-called DOT number on the tyre flank, you can quickly determine how old the tyre actually is. The number accompanying the letters DOT is always a four digit number, specifying the production week and year of the tyre, i.e. 1302 for week 13 in year 2002.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

During the 2014 test program, tyre-testing expert Dieter Röscheisen evaluated a twelve year old tyre as very critical, particularly regarding wet handling: “The tyre was tested on a 1988 930 Turbo. This twelve year old tyre offers very little traction, particularly when wet, with correspondingly weak braking performance and is therefore extremely tricky to drive, especially in vehicles without ABS, due to the high blocking tendency of the front wheels. It initially steers very sluggishly into curves. This leads to an uncomfortable understeer, which is atypical for the basic setup of the Porsche. At some point during the curve, it usually suddenly develops some traction which in turn makes the rear act uneasily. The driving behaviour of the standard Porsche 930 is really affected by this and requires an expert hand, particularly in the wet, to prevent abrupt breakaways. It is difficult to impossible to drive quickly in a clean line.”

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

A completely different tone is struck in the test evaluation results regarding a new 185/70 R 15 tyre for the 1963 Porsche 356. The original words on the evaluation sheet: “This set leaves a very good overall impression, even on the 356 with the smallest 5.0 J x 15 rims. A lot of grip is present and the balance is good. Over and understeering tendency is low and the grip breakaway is not too abrupt. This makes the rear a bit more agile overall. One can drive fast and precisely, with a very safe feeling at all times. The tyre offers a high safety reserve and has no particular weak points.”

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Just as an aside, this vintage Porsche, a 356 Super 90 model from the museum collection, is probably equipped with slightly better tyres today and drives with more balanced driving characteristics than when it was built 51 years ago in 1963.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Approximately 300 tyres to choose from
The afore-mentioned and other new tyre qualities of tested and approved designs and matches are listed in detail on the Porsche Classic homepage. There are approximately 300 approved summer and winter tyres available for Porsche sports cars built between 1949 and 2005. There maybe five to seven recommendations available for certain models, depending on the rim sizes.
This is because not every new tyre developed and matched with a current model was continued to be manufactured for decades after the period during which it was produced as original equipment. Some types were simply discontinued, others are modified due to new regulations regarding the rubber compound recipes. This is, for instance, the case if specific chemical compounds used in tyre production are changed when more modern components come onto the market offering better grip and, simultaneously, less rolling resistance. The tyre manufacturers cannot let such developments pass them by.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Simply mounting the tyres of subsequent evolutionary stages without testing onto rims of older vehicles has not been successful in practice. There have been cases within the broad field of historic vehicles where the car has become almost uncontrollable when driving at the limits after it had been equipped with unspecified tyres. Really disastrous driving behaviour is not necessarily the immediate result. However, in the majority of cases, significantly unbalanced behaviour during steering and handling resulted. A particularly negative problem is when a tyre performs poorly under wet conditions. Just like all other drivers, the driver of an older Porsche cannot choose the weather on the roads being travelled upon.

This is just one of the reasons why the new developments for older vehicles by the tyre industry are subjected to the Porsche test program. In numerous cases this leads to a cooperation in the further development of specific tyre types, often leading to highly commendable test evaluations for the various tyre types. The “N” mark on the flank unifies them all as tested and approved.

One of the manufacturer’s tasks here is also to maintain a suitable stock: Tyres for models from the sixties and seventies are – due to the lack of demand – no longer manufactured in continuous mass production. Instead, a new series is produced from time to time when required. If suitably stored (cool and dark), the tyres only age slowly and slightly. This ensures that the quality is maintained, even after a few years. Porsche Classic only recommends those tyre types that performed well in the test procedures.

Preventing ageing: Store tyres like good wine
A tyre starts to lose suppleness and grip after about five years. It does not, of course, become abruptly undriveable, but starts to appreciably lose balance over subsequent years. However, the effects of ageing can be slowed down if storage is implemented with care – in a similar manner to good wine: Tyres age less rapidly if stored in the dark at lower temperatures. If you can afford it and have the necessary space to do so, store a fresh set of tyres for your forthcoming pleasure tours in your cool cellar and park your vintage Porsche in the garage on a set of – maybe well worn – “standing tyres”.

If you don’t want to or cannot change the tyres so frequently, you should pay attention to the following tips. Because, if the vehicle stands for too long in one place without greatly increased tyre pressure, so-called “flat spots” occur. It is therefore common practice to raise the air pressure up to the maximum permissible pressure for the rims, which is usually 4.5 bar, when storing cars. So-called tyre shoes or tyre pillows, obtainable from accessory dealers, are also useful in this case. These are concave supports made of rubber, plastic or wood placed under the wheels so that the car is parked with all four wheels in the hollows. The concave form distributes the tyre contact area over a significantly larger area and prevents the tyre from becoming square during the standing time due to flat spots.

Porsche therefore ensures, through their regular tyre tests for Porsche classic cars and modern classics, that driving pleasure and driving safety are not diminished, even in older models.

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Source: Porsche

Porsche Product and Technology Communication
Porsche Product Communication

 

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Video: Porsche 911 Canyon Carving with Chad McQueen and Nicolas Hunziker

Join Chad & Nic and their 911 longhoods on an early morning drive.

911 Canyon Carving with Chad McQueen,   Nicolas Hunziker

911 Canyon Carving with Chad McQueen, Nicolas Hunziker

By McQueen Racing, Stoddard Parts, Gulf Oil for their support.
Still Photography by Frank Kayser.

 

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Porsche 911 Storm tested: Adaptive Aerodynamics

Air makes things slower. And air makes things faster: Aerodynamics is both a curse and a blessing for sports cars. The keyword here: downforce.

Throughout its 50 years of development, the basic form of the Porsche 911 has been a perfect aerodynamic example of the latter. At the same time, the 911 provides an impressive lesson on how it is possible to continue to aerodynamically refine a car’s basic form without losing key aspects of its distinctive design and brand recognition.

The aerodynamic contour of the Porsche 911 stems from the 1950s and is a legacy of the Porsche 356. In those days, attempts were made to adopt and develop streamlined forms from aviation. The role model for the contour of the original Porsche was a teardrop profile of a cross-section of an aircraft wing. The advantages of this form: It reduces drag, and high driving speeds can be achieved even at low engine output – a basic Porsche principle. This also provided the foundation for success in motor sports. Because Porsche sports cars have also always been designed for motor sports, the brand’s classical testing grounds. Reduced power output means reduced energy consumption. Outstanding efficiency has always been an essential trait of the 911.

However, flow dynamics around the basic form of a 911 are not always advantageous. A basic disadvantage of a sports car with a streamlined chassis is the “lift-off effect” (aerodynamic lift) at the front and rear axles – which is required in aircraft, but not in automobiles. It is especially detrimental, since lift forces increase exponentially with vehicle speed: Doubling vehicle speed quadruples the force of aerodynamic lift. From about 80 km/h, air is the dominating drag force that counters all further acceleration and needs to be overcome with engine power.

Long rear section for low air drag

The flow dynamics of any given basic form produces both drag and lift forces. In order to reduce their effects, the flow dynamics must be modified in specific ways with the help of aerodynamic add-on parts. A legendary example was provided by Porsche in the early 1970s in the form of the 917 racing car, which was equipped with an extra long chassis for high speed tracks – the famous long-tail racing car with particularly low air drag for Le Mans.

Based on this experience, Porsche equipped the 911 S with the first front spoiler in 1971. It accelerated the air flow underneath the vehicle, diverted some of the air around the sides and therefore reduced aerodynamic lift of the vehicle’s front section. The advantages were improved directional stability and easier controllability. The Carrera RS 2.7, designed for motor sports in 1972, brought a milestone in aerodynamic development to the market: Not only was it equipped with a low-slung front spoiler, but also with a distinctive spoiler over the bonnet – the legendary “ducktail”. Both add-on components improved airflow around the 911 and reduced aerodynamic lift and drag. The result: The Carrera RS 2.7 was particularly fast and efficient, while also offering excellent road-handling characteristics at high speeds. One year later, the prototype of the first 911 Turbo further intensified on-going aerodynamic development of the 911 chassis with a large, fixed rear spoiler.

Porsche 911 Turbo Aerodynamics: Best of All Worlds 

Treadmill ground simulation in the wind tunnel

Porsche has continued to improve the aerodynamics of the 911 and reduce its air drag and lift from generation to generation. Driving performance increased while fuel consumption was reduced. The cladding of the undercarriage became increasingly smoother. All air flows used for brake and engine cooling are aerodynamically optimised, which results in a particularly efficient design.

In this area, Porsche focuses on state-of-the-art development tools. Simulations are initially used to test the effects of aerodynamically relevant designs on airflow through and around the vehicle. To optimise cooling requirements, the simulation also includes heat sources such as the engine, transmission, exhaust system and brakes. Aerodynamics engineers can also access a wind tunnel equipped with a highly accurate weight scale and a moving belt ground simulator. The weight scale permits exact measurement of how lift or downforce affect axle loads as a function of speed. The moving belt simulates the road and can run underneath the vehicle at speeds of up to 300 km/h to simulate the relative motion between the car and the road as realistically as possible.

The importance of aerodynamics continued to grow with increases in road performance and the brand’s standard for continual performance improvement. In the late 1980s, Porsche developed an extendable rear spoiler for the 964 to combine the indispensable effect of vehicle bypass flows with the demands on the typical Porsche design. This completed the first step towards adaptive aerodynamics.

Source: Porsche AG / Technology

 

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LIVE FEED: Porsche at the Geneva Motor Show – Worldwide motorsport programme: premiere for the 919 Hybrid and 911 RSR

Mission 2014. Our Return..png2

TUNE IN TO: Porsche at the Geneva Motor Show
Worldwide motorsport programme: premiere for the 919 Hybrid and 911 RSR

Stuttgart. At this year’s Geneva Motor Show Porsche is putting the focus on its return to the world of motorsports. The highlight is the world premiere of the new Porsche 919 Hybrid for the top category of the sports car World Endurance Championship (WEC) in 2014, with the 24 Hours of Le Mans as the undisputed highlight of the season. The new efficiency-based regulations of the WEC stipulate innovative hybrid drives. The 919 Hybrid can therefore be regarded as a research laboratory for the technology of future production vehicles. The innovative prototype will be flanked on the stage in Geneva by the Porsche 911 RSR, as it will in all eight WEC races. What’s more, Porsche is presenting the Macan S Diesel1) to the public for the first time, whilst the 911 Targa2) is celebrating its European debut.

The press conference with all premieres will take place on 4 March 2014 at 8:20 CET at the Porsche stand, GENEVA PALEXPO, hall 1.

The conference will be broadcast live on the Internet (http://www.porsche.com/mission2014) and via satellite.

Europe / Middle East – live HD Feed
Date: March 04, 2014
Time: 08:20-08:35am CET / 07:20-07:35am GMT

Satellite: EUT 10 A
Transponder (digital): F5, Channel 13-24
Downlink Frequency: 12.699,330 MHz
Polarisation: X
Video Std: 1080i/50 Hz PAL
Audio Channels: Channel 1: IT ; Channel 2: English
Modulation: DVB-S2 / 8PSK
Symbol rate: 14.400 Msym/s
FEC: 3/4
MPEG: 4:2:2 / MPEG2
Encryption: No encryption

Europe / Middle East – live SD Feed
Date: March 04, 2014
Time: 08:20-08:35am CET / 07:20-07:35am GMT

Satellite: EUT 10 A
Transponder (digital): F6, Channel E
Downlink Frequency: 12.712,830 MHz
Polarisation: Y
Video Std: 625 PAL / 16:9
Audio Channels: Channel 1: IT ; Channel 2: English
Modulation: DVB-S / QPSK
Symbol rate: 6.6665 Msym/s
FEC: 7/8
MPEG: 4:2:2 / MPEG2
Encryption: No encryption

USA / Canada / South America – live HD Feed
Date: March 04, 2014
Time: 02:20-02:35am EST / 07:20-07:35am GMT

Satellite: IS 805 on 304,5° east
Transponder (digital): 14/14, Channel GH
Downlink Frequency: 4.022,000 MHz
Polarisation: Y
Video Std: 1080i/59,9Hz in NTSC
Audio Channels: Channel 1: IT ; Channel 2: English
Modulation: DVB-S2 / 8PSK
Symbol rate: 14.400 Msym/s
FEC: 3/4
MPEG: 4:2:2 / MPEG2
Encryption: No encryption

USA / Canada / South America – live SD Feed
Date: March 04, 2014
Time: 02:20-02:35am EST / 07:20-07:35am GMT

Satellite: IS 805 on 304,5° east
Transponder (digital): 24/24, Channel E
Downlink Frequency: 3.999,500 MHz
Polarisation: X
Video Std: NTSC 16:9
Audio Channels: Channel 1: IT ; Channel 2: English
Modulation: DVB-S / QPSK
Symbol rate: 6.6665 Msym/s
FEC: 7/8
MPEG: 4:2:2 / MPEG2
Encryption: No encryption

South-Africa – live SD Feed
Date: March 04, 2014
Time: 07:20-07:35am GMT

Satellite: NSS 7 on 20° west
Transponder (digital): EUH4/SAH4, Channel 9/1
Downlink Frequency: 11.184,500 MHz
Polarisation: X
Video Std: 625 PAL / 16:9
Audio Channels: Channel 1: IT ; Channel 2: English
Modulation: DVB-S / QPSK
Symbol rate: 6.6665 Msym/s
FEC: 7/8
MPEG: 4:2:2 / MPEG2
Encryption: No encryption

Product and Technology Communication
Porsche Motorsport Press – Holger Eckhardt

 

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