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US customers vote Porsche most popular vehicle brand

J.D. Power: Stuttgart sports car manufacturer in first place for the eleventh time in succession

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Westlake Village/Stuttgart. Stuttgart-based sports car manufacturer Porsche enjoys an outstanding reputation with its US customers. This is confirmed by the 20th edition of the renowned ‘Automotive Performance, Execution and Layout’ (APEAL) study produced by US market research institute J.D. Power.

For the eleventh time in succession, Porsche occupies first place in the overall rankings and thus continues to be the make of car with the greatest appeal for drivers in the USA.

In the APPEAL vehicle rankings the Macan – represented in the study for the first time this year – goes straight in at number one in the ‘Compact Premium SUV’ segment.

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The sporty SUV Cayenne also enjoys great popularity among US customers and in the ‘Midsize Premium SUV’ segment takes top position for what is already the fifth time in a row.

Cayenne

Cayenne

The Cayman too gained the most points in its class, taking the ‘Highest Ranked Apeal’ award in the ‘Compact Premium Sporty Car’ category.

Last month, Porsche drivers in the USA had already voted the Porsche brand into first place in the ‘Initial Quality Study’. The excellent results from both studies reflect the currently positive trend in the US market. In the course of the year to date, the Stuttgart-based sports car manufacturer has supplied over 30,000 vehicles to customers in the USA, thus achieving an increase of 13 per cent compared to January to June 2014.

The APPEAL study determines the appeal of vehicles in the North American market. It annually surveys around 84,000 new car owners with vehicles that were licensed between November and February.

In total, it reviews 77 features in ten categories. In addition to driving performance and design, other aspects taken into account include comfort and suitability for everyday use.

Communication Porsche AG
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Posted by on July 22, 2015 in Porsche Museum

 

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Best grip thanks to modern tyres – even for classic Porsche cars

New tyre approval lists published following extensive tests with classic Porsche models

Stuttgart. Drivers of classic Porsche sports cars can now find the new lists with all tyres approved by Porsche for download on the Porsche Classic website. These tyre approval lists represent the results of extensive tests over several weeks carried out by the Porsche tyre experts this summer. They used classic Porsche sports cars and modern classics such as a 356, a 911 Carrera G model, a 911 Turbo (930) and a first generation Porsche Boxster (986) for these tests.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356, 911 Carrera G-Modell, first generation Boxster

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356, 911 Carrera G-Modell, first generation Boxster

Such tests take place on a regular basis to test and approve newly developed tyres for classic Porsche cars. The approval is also documented by the so-called N marking on the tyre flank.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Porsche is the only manufacturer that performs such an extensive service for older models, ranging from those 356 models that are over 50 years old, through all the 911 generations and the transaxle models 924/944/968 and 928, right up to the first Boxster (986). This is justifiable as around two thirds of all Porsche sports cars ever built are still driving more or less regularly on our roads.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

With these tyre tests for classic sports cars, Porsche ensures that these older models also profit from the progress made in tyre development and can take advantage of the modern tyres that are tailored to meet their requirements. This benefits driving behaviour and driving safety with regards to grip on wet roads and shorter braking distances.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

The latest lists with the new tyres added this year can be downloaded from the Internet using this link:
http://www.porsche.com/germany/accessoriesandservices/classic/galleryanddownloads/downloads/

Continue reading the following pages to find out how these tyre tests take place and what else need to be considered with respect to tyres for classic Porsche sports cars.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Porsche tests new tyres for sports cars up to 65 years old
As around two thirds of all Porsche models ever built are still in driving condition, Porsche takes a lot of effort to look after these older models. You can see this from the format that is used for the tyre approval for older models: Currently, there are 183 recommendations, just for the right summer tyres, for those models built between 1949 and 2005. Another 126 recommendations apply to winter tyres.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: modern tyres preserve driving pleasure and driving safety

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: modern tyres preserve driving pleasure and driving safety

All these approvals are usually updated every two years through ongoing tests. The reason for all this effort is obvious: As the manufacturer, Porsche cannot abandon owners with regards to the right tyre types, because many owners are still lovingly taking care of and driving their Porsche models that reach back into the fifties and sixties. Independent tyre businesses, if faced with a 1963 Porsche 356 and tyre format 185/70 R 15, would for instance probably use those tyre types that are generally available for the remaining VW Beetle population and the various Transporter models.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: extensive testing by Porsche tyre experts

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: extensive testing by Porsche tyre experts

However, special tyre approvals for new Porsche models already applied in the past, and these were practically always based on special development steps by the tyre manufacturer and specifically designed for Porsche. Selecting a new set of tyres for a 356 model on the basis of “only size matters” would therefore essentially be a mistake. The beautiful vintage car would not be radically unfit to drive in most cases, but the original skill of such a car for a safe road stance and playful handling would be pretty much left at the road side. Maybe not when dry, but fairly probably when the road was wet. Such incorrect choices are why Porsche has carried out the latest tyre tests.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Oldsters can be dashing too
To avoid dramatic errors, new tyre models are tested and processed for approval for all the older car models. The Porsche Museum and Porsche Classic are always delighted to open up their fleets and send the cars out onto the test track. In this way, robust test drives take place on the test grounds of Contidrom near Hanover using those Porsche models that already have a few decades tucked under their elegantly designed bonnets. Porsche Classic adopts the recommendations of the tyre test specialists who, particularly in the case of Dieter Röscheisen, can look back over a few dozen years of tyre testing experience. He therefore stands on a level playing field with his classic format test cars and is usually just as fast when on the go.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Because tyre testing also means driving at the limit in a controlled manner. The disciplines of dry and wet handling are of paramount interest, while brake testing and aquaplaning tests round off the test program. The entire test program is aimed at precisely measuring how the tyres behave up to the limits. Every facet of behaviour, from the initial steering movement to the exit of the bend, is precisely analysed and logged for each set of tyres in the test. The car turning cleanly into the bend is just the first step towards approval. Well-controlled behaviour under high transverse acceleration is obligatory, and exiting bends must be mastered without any discontinuous loss of road adherence.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

A harmonious performance is paramount
The tests always comprise several rounds on the test track, which is rich in curves, and precisely determined lap times are used for comparative purposes. A tyre must deliver performance at its limits in a predictable and balanced manner to obtain a good evaluation. The same applies understandably to the front and rear axles as this is only way to get good marks and the prospect of approval for the historic vehicle series.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

The marking that turns tyres in a historically valuable dimension into Porsche tyres is therefore a type of quality seal: Those tyre models recommended by Porsche bear the mark “N” on the tyre flank, always in combination with a number (N0, N1, N2, etc.). This “N” has for decades been the hallmark for the special tyre designs developed for Porsche. Naturally, it would have been nice at the time to be able to select “P” or “Po” for Porsche. But the international development of the tyre standards led to N being chosen as the unmistakable mark for the selected approval by Porsche and that is how it stands today. The experts all know, the “N” belongs to Porsche when it comes to tyres.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

The corresponding number after the “N” is solely used to differentiate the approval series. Example: The first version of a tyre with the dimension 195/65 R 15 was approved with the mark N0 for the applicable Carrera series in the seventies. When a new series of the same tyre, manufacture and type is designed and approved for production as replacement parts, the tyre is assigned the next higher auxiliary number – in this case 1 – to differentiate it from the previous series.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Turbo (1983)

Keyword tyre ageing
This particularly critical aspect was also tested during the latest test series in summer 2014. This effect mainly plays a role when a vehicle with a long history is only rarely driven and spends more time standing than driving. The tyres visibly become more brittle, the traction and level of grip decrease. The word “undriveable” may not apply directly if such a tyre is just over five years old. But the capability for a smooth driving style, which may have characterised it at one point, decreases steadily with increasing age in all cases. If you take a look at the so-called DOT number on the tyre flank, you can quickly determine how old the tyre actually is. The number accompanying the letters DOT is always a four digit number, specifying the production week and year of the tyre, i.e. 1302 for week 13 in year 2002.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

During the 2014 test program, tyre-testing expert Dieter Röscheisen evaluated a twelve year old tyre as very critical, particularly regarding wet handling: “The tyre was tested on a 1988 930 Turbo. This twelve year old tyre offers very little traction, particularly when wet, with correspondingly weak braking performance and is therefore extremely tricky to drive, especially in vehicles without ABS, due to the high blocking tendency of the front wheels. It initially steers very sluggishly into curves. This leads to an uncomfortable understeer, which is atypical for the basic setup of the Porsche. At some point during the curve, it usually suddenly develops some traction which in turn makes the rear act uneasily. The driving behaviour of the standard Porsche 930 is really affected by this and requires an expert hand, particularly in the wet, to prevent abrupt breakaways. It is difficult to impossible to drive quickly in a clean line.”

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: first generation Boxster (1996)

A completely different tone is struck in the test evaluation results regarding a new 185/70 R 15 tyre for the 1963 Porsche 356. The original words on the evaluation sheet: “This set leaves a very good overall impression, even on the 356 with the smallest 5.0 J x 15 rims. A lot of grip is present and the balance is good. Over and understeering tendency is low and the grip breakaway is not too abrupt. This makes the rear a bit more agile overall. One can drive fast and precisely, with a very safe feeling at all times. The tyre offers a high safety reserve and has no particular weak points.”

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Just as an aside, this vintage Porsche, a 356 Super 90 model from the museum collection, is probably equipped with slightly better tyres today and drives with more balanced driving characteristics than when it was built 51 years ago in 1963.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 356 B 1600 Super 90 (1963)

Approximately 300 tyres to choose from
The afore-mentioned and other new tyre qualities of tested and approved designs and matches are listed in detail on the Porsche Classic homepage. There are approximately 300 approved summer and winter tyres available for Porsche sports cars built between 1949 and 2005. There maybe five to seven recommendations available for certain models, depending on the rim sizes.
This is because not every new tyre developed and matched with a current model was continued to be manufactured for decades after the period during which it was produced as original equipment. Some types were simply discontinued, others are modified due to new regulations regarding the rubber compound recipes. This is, for instance, the case if specific chemical compounds used in tyre production are changed when more modern components come onto the market offering better grip and, simultaneously, less rolling resistance. The tyre manufacturers cannot let such developments pass them by.

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Tyre tests for classic Porsche cars: 911 Carrera G-Modell (1975)

Simply mounting the tyres of subsequent evolutionary stages without testing onto rims of older vehicles has not been successful in practice. There have been cases within the broad field of historic vehicles where the car has become almost uncontrollable when driving at the limits after it had been equipped with unspecified tyres. Really disastrous driving behaviour is not necessarily the immediate result. However, in the majority of cases, significantly unbalanced behaviour during steering and handling resulted. A particularly negative problem is when a tyre performs poorly under wet conditions. Just like all other drivers, the driver of an older Porsche cannot choose the weather on the roads being travelled upon.

This is just one of the reasons why the new developments for older vehicles by the tyre industry are subjected to the Porsche test program. In numerous cases this leads to a cooperation in the further development of specific tyre types, often leading to highly commendable test evaluations for the various tyre types. The “N” mark on the flank unifies them all as tested and approved.

One of the manufacturer’s tasks here is also to maintain a suitable stock: Tyres for models from the sixties and seventies are – due to the lack of demand – no longer manufactured in continuous mass production. Instead, a new series is produced from time to time when required. If suitably stored (cool and dark), the tyres only age slowly and slightly. This ensures that the quality is maintained, even after a few years. Porsche Classic only recommends those tyre types that performed well in the test procedures.

Preventing ageing: Store tyres like good wine
A tyre starts to lose suppleness and grip after about five years. It does not, of course, become abruptly undriveable, but starts to appreciably lose balance over subsequent years. However, the effects of ageing can be slowed down if storage is implemented with care – in a similar manner to good wine: Tyres age less rapidly if stored in the dark at lower temperatures. If you can afford it and have the necessary space to do so, store a fresh set of tyres for your forthcoming pleasure tours in your cool cellar and park your vintage Porsche in the garage on a set of – maybe well worn – “standing tyres”.

If you don’t want to or cannot change the tyres so frequently, you should pay attention to the following tips. Because, if the vehicle stands for too long in one place without greatly increased tyre pressure, so-called “flat spots” occur. It is therefore common practice to raise the air pressure up to the maximum permissible pressure for the rims, which is usually 4.5 bar, when storing cars. So-called tyre shoes or tyre pillows, obtainable from accessory dealers, are also useful in this case. These are concave supports made of rubber, plastic or wood placed under the wheels so that the car is parked with all four wheels in the hollows. The concave form distributes the tyre contact area over a significantly larger area and prevents the tyre from becoming square during the standing time due to flat spots.

Porsche therefore ensures, through their regular tyre tests for Porsche classic cars and modern classics, that driving pleasure and driving safety are not diminished, even in older models.

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Source: Porsche

Porsche Product and Technology Communication
Porsche Product Communication

 

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Porsche ‘Rolling Museum’ highlights 2014

An action-packed year awaits the racing legends of the Porsche Museum

 

Stuttgart. This year, the Porsche Museum will again be showcasing racing vehicles from the marque’s successful history at the most prestigious classic car events around the globe. Calendar highlights for the ‘Rolling Museum’ will include the Mille Miglia and the Goodwood ‘Festival of Speed’. The brand ambassador’s key dates for 2014 are already set:

From 15th to 18th May the Porsche Museum will be entering an impressive starting field for the 1,000 miles of the legendary Mille Miglia. Competing in the famous long-distance road race will be a 550 Spyder, two 356 Coupés and a 356 Speedster. The drivers of the unique vehicles will include Dr. Wolfgang Porsche, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, and racing legend Jacky Ickx. For both drivers and vehicles the Mille Miglia is still a challenge today, as the new route of 1,750 kilometres is covered in just four days and leads in the main through differing weather zones.

From 15th to 18th May the Porsche Museum will be entering an impressive starting field for the 1,000 miles of the legendary Mille Miglia.

From 15th to 18th May the Porsche Museum will be entering an impressive starting field for the 1,000 miles of the legendary Mille Miglia.

From the 6th to 7th July, the Porsche Museum’s classic racing cars will participate in the traditional ‘Paul Pietsch Klassik’. Over a course of 450 kilometres two-time rally world champion Walter Röhrl and Le Mans winner and DTM champion Hans-Joachim Stuck will be driving a 911 Carrera 2.7 RS and a 911
Speedster across the south-west of Germany.

This summer Walter Röhrl will participate in the "Paul Pietsch Klassik" across the south-west of Germany with the Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS.

This summer Walter Röhrl will participate in the “Paul Pietsch Klassik” across the south-west of Germany with the Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS.

The Goodwood ‘Festival of Speed’ is inconceivable without a Porsche. An annual event since 1993 on the estate of Lord March in West Sussex, it takes place this year from 26th to 29th June. The ‘Festival of Speed’ is the largest event of its kind anywhere in the world. The spectators can look forward to seeing numerous famous classic Porsche cars. The focus this year is on the ‘Turbo’ theme. The cars to be seen will therefore include a Porsche 959 Group B, a 964 Turbo, a 993 Turbo and a Porsche 935, known as the ‘Baby’ due to its scaled down 1.4-litre engine. Also awaiting the visitors are two special Porsche 917s: the Porsche 917 KH, which brings back memories of the first overall Porsche victory at Le Mans, and the Porsche 917/30, which was developed for the CanAm race series.

Again this year the participants of the Mille Miglia will be guided through the narrow alleys of Italy.

Again this year the participants of the Mille Miglia will be guided through the narrow alleys of Italy.

Coinciding with Porsche’s return to the 24-hour endurance race with the Porsche 919 Hybrid, a number of famous Porsche vehicles will also be appearing at the Le Mans Classic from 4th to 6th July. This summer the Porsche Museum is sending four participants to France – a 911 Carrera RSR Targa Florio, the Porsche 935/77 Group 5 racing car, a 911 Turbo Cabriolet and a 911 Turbo 3.0.

From 10th to 12th July, the Porsche Museum will then be lining up several historic legends at the ‘Ennstal Classic’, where this year Porsche will be the main theme. With a hill prologue, tours through the Tauern Mountains and a city grand prix, the three-day event provides a festival of motoring for drivers and spectators. In addition to a number of Porsche 356 cars, one of which will be driven by Dr. Wolfgang Porsche, a 911 2.2 Targa will also compete. The visitors will have the chance to admire the skills of former racing drivers such as Walter Röhrl in a 718 WRS, Jacky Ickx in the legendary 550 A Spyder and current Porsche works driver Marc Lieb in a GT1’98 as they take part in the ‘Chopard Grand Prix von Gröbming’.

The Porsche Museum will also be taking its classic cars to the ‘6th Schloss Bensberg Classic’, which takes place around the Grandhotel Schloss Bensberg from 18th to 20th July, and from 14th to 17th August it will be present at the famous ‘Pebble Beach – Concours d’Elegance’ event in California. From the 21st to 24th August the Porsche Museum will then be lining up in the ‘Sachsen Classic’ in Saxony. In the course of this classic car rally, vehicles including a 356 Speedster, a 911 Targa and a 911 Turbo will cover a course of 610 kilometres from Zwickau to Chemnitz all around the Vogtland region.

With its concept of the ‘Rolling Museum’ Porsche is taking a very special approach. Practically all of the museum exhibits are roadworthy and thus fulfil the original purpose for which they were built: to be driven. And the specialists of the Porsche Museum workshop ensure that both before and during every tour of duty the rolling ambassadors of Porsche history are well prepared and in top fit form for every event. Unlike almost any other motoring museum the Porsche Museum thus stands for variety and vibrancy. Instead of a conventional, static exhibition, as a result of the exhibits being continuously rearranged it offers a constantly changing scene in Zuffenhausen.

More details are available online at http://www.porsche.com/museum.

Source:

Communication Porsche AG
Porsche Museum

 

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New Special Exhibition: “24 Hours for Eternity. Le Mans.” First presentation of the 919 Hybrid in the Porsche Museum

 

From March 26 to July 13, 2014, the Porsche Museum presents a comprehensive special exhibition about Le Mans.

From March 26 to July 13, 2014, the Porsche Museum presents a comprehensive special exhibition about Le Mans.

Stuttgart. The Porsche Museum in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen is getting attuned to the return of the sports car maker to Le Mans: with a comprehensive special exhibition from March 26 to July 13, 2014, Porsche is taking a look back not only to its multiple previous successes at the French endurance race.

The present-day Le Mans commitment is also being placed on centre stage: for the first time, the Porsche 919 Hybrid will be presented to the greater public at the Porsche Museum. The car celebrated its premiere only three weeks ago at the Geneva Motor Show.

Until May 4th, 2014, the 919 Hybrid mock-up will be on display at the Porsche Museum.

Until May 4th, 2014, the 919 Hybrid mock-up will be on display at the Porsche Museum.

The exhibition at the Porsche Museum is transformed to a racing track in homage to the famous endurance race. The focus will be on the 919 Hybrid, the fastest research lab and most complex racing car Porsche has ever built. The onset of the Porsche Le Mans history in 1951 marks the beginning of the “24 Hours for Eternity” special exhibition.

For the first time on display: The Porsche 908/02 Spyder LH with the nickname „shark fines“ achieves the 3rd place in the overall classification.

For the first time on display: The Porsche 908/02 Spyder LH with the nickname „shark fines“ achieves the 3rd place in the overall classification.

Re-enactments of racing situations from the victorious racing years on life-sized prism walls and track sections such as the Hunaudières straight will guide the museum visitor through the special exhibition.

New: Re-enactments of racing situations from the victorious racing years of Porsche will be presented on life-sized prism walls.

New: Re-enactments of racing situations from the victorious racing years of Porsche will be presented on life-sized prism walls.

More than 20 different racing cars tell the unique and exciting history of this legendary 24-hour race. Alongside the 919 Hybrid, you can see at the Porsche Museum for the first time the 1969 Porsche 908/2 Spyder long tail, the 1971 Porsche 911 T/R, the 1974 Porsche 911 3.0 RSR as well as the 1981 Porsche 936/81 Spyder and many more. The Porsche 936, which already captured the races in 1976 and 1977, is reactivated in 1981 for the 24-hour race. With 360 km/h, the 936 is the fastest vehicle in the field on the Mulsanne straight and brings its drivers Jacky Ickx and Derek Bell the sixth overall victory – with a lead of 14 laps.

Also Porsche`s last winner car of Le Mans from 1998 will be displayed: the Porsche 911 GT1 `98.

Also Porsche`s last winner car of Le Mans from 1998 will be displayed: the Porsche 911 GT1 `98.

The cars on exhibit also include the 1979 Porsche 935, the Porsche 911 GT2 Le Mans, the 1994 Porsche 962 GT Dauer Le Mans as well as the WSC LMP1 of 1998. With the 962 GT Dauer Le Mans, Porsche competed in the 24-hour race under the direction of the Joest team in 1994. With this car, Mauro Baldi, Yannick Dalmas and Hurley Haywood took home the 13th overall win for Porsche. The model that Hans-Joachim Stuck, Danny Sullivan and Thierry Boutsen drove awaits the visitor here in the museum. This and other historical tales of the famous race will come alive in the special exhibition. Various historical and technological small exhibit pieces such as helmets, a brake disc from the Porsche 956 and the diary of Ferry Porsche from the collection of the Porsche corporate archive round off perfectly the historical journey through time of Porsche at Le Mans.

On the weekend of the race, June 14th to 15th, visitors can follow the race live as part of a public viewing in the Porsche Museum (free entrance then).

On the weekend of the race, June 14th to 15th, visitors can follow the race live as part of a public viewing in the Porsche Museum (free entrance then).

On the weekend of the race, the Porsche Museum will be open for the first time for more than 24 hours straight, from Saturday, June 14, starting at 9:00 a.m., until Sunday, June 15, 6:00 p.m. Visitors and fans of the endurance race can follow the race live as part of a public viewing programme on several monitors inside and around the museum building. Entrance is free of charge on this racing weekend.

All 16 Porsche winners of Le Mans will be available as model cars in a scale of 1:43 in the shop of the Porsche Museum.

All 16 Porsche winners of Le Mans will be available as model cars in a scale of 1:43 in the shop of the Porsche Museum.

The museum shop has a selection of specific items as part of the Le Mans special exhibition for sale to the public. Along with posters, postcards and polo shirts, all 16 overall winners of Le Mans will be available as model cars in a scale of 1:43. The Porsche Museum is open from 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tuesday to Sunday admission is eight euros for adults. Reduced price tickets cost four euros. You’ll find more information on the Internet at: http://www.porsche.com/museum.

Source: Communication Porsche AG
Porsche Museum

 

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The world’s very first Porsche design – the return of the “P1” …World premiere on the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum

 

 

World premiere on the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum: the return of the “P1”

World premiere on the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum: the return of the “P1”

Stuttgart. Since the construction of the first sportscar to bear the Porsche name – the Type 356 from 1948 – Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG has been regarded as the world’s leading sportscar manufacturer. Yet the company’s history dates back to a much earlier period: In 1898, Ferdinand Porsche presented the “Egger-Lohner electric vehicle, C.2 Phaeton model” (known as the “P1” for short) – the world’s first Porsche design.

Porsche engraved the code “P1” (standing for Porsche, number 1) onto all of the key components.

Porsche engraved the code “P1” (standing for Porsche, number 1) onto all of the key components.

After 116 years, the original and unrestored vehicle has been recovered and is set to enrich the Porsche Museum’s collection as a technical and historical worldwide sensation.

Five years since it opened in January 2009, the addition of this design sees the Porsche Museum reorient its permanent exhibition. Alongside a restructuring of the layout for the area dedicated to product and motorsport history, the “P1” now forms a centrepiece used to introduce visitors to the first part of the exhibition – the “prologue”.

The highly compact electric drive, weighing just 130 kg, offered an output of 3 hp.

The highly compact electric drive, weighing just 130 kg, offered an output of 3 hp.

The innovative vehicle concept of the “P1” will bridge the gap between the past and present-day developments such as the Porsche 918 Spyder. As a technological benchmark, the 918 Spyder follows a long tradition that first started 116 years ago with the “P1”.

The draft of "Egger-Lohner electric vehicle C.2 Phaeton".

The draft of “Egger-Lohner electric vehicle C.2 Phaeton”.

The “P1” – designed and built by Ferdinand Porsche – was one of the first vehicles registered in Austria, and took to the streets of Vienna on June 26, 1898.

In 1898, Ferdinand Porsche presented the "P1".

In 1898, Ferdinand Porsche presented the “P1”.

Porsche engraved the code “P1” (standing for Porsche, number 1) onto all of the key components, thus giving the electric vehicle its unofficial name. The sheer volume of ideas realised within this vehicle remains remarkable even today. The highly compact electric drive, weighing just 130 kg, offered an output of 3 hp. For short periods, up to 5 hp could be achieved in overloading mode, allowing the P1 to reach up to 35 km/h. When driven in this manner, the vehicle speed was regulated via a 12-speed controller. The overall range of the vehicle could span up to 80 kilometres, a considerable feat for a vehicle of that period. A further innovation was the Lohner alternating vehicle body, which allowed the vehicle to be used in both summer and winter.

The overall range of the vehicle could span up to 80 kilometres.

The overall range of the vehicle could span up to 80 kilometres.

The first practical test awaited the “P1” in September 1899 at the international motor vehicle exhibition in the German capital of Berlin. Even as early as 1899, the competition to produce the best drive systems was already fierce. A race for electric vehicles over a distance of 40 km was announced in Berlin for September 28 to test the performance of the vehicles, with a prize to be awarded to the winner. The route demanded a great amount of skill from the participants, who had to tackle challenges such as gradients. With three passengers on board, Ferdinand Porsche steered his “P1” across the finish line 18 minutes ahead of the next competitor. More than half the participants failed to reach the finish line due to technical difficulties. Ferdinand Porsche also came out on top in the efficiency test, as his “P1” recorded the lowest energy consumption in urban traffic.

On Friday, January 31, 2014, Dr. Wolfgang Porsche, Chairman of the Supervisory Board of Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, and Matthias Müller, President and CEO of Porsche AG, will unveil the “P1” before an audience of invited guests. The following weekend, on February 1 and 2, the “P1” can be viewed free of charge as part of the celebrations to mark the fifth anniversary of the Porsche Museum.

On February 1st, 2014 for the very first time on display at the Porsche Museum: The first design of Ferdinand Porsche from 1898.

On February 1st, 2014 for the very first time on display at the Porsche Museum: The first design of Ferdinand Porsche from 1898.

The museum is open Tuesday to Sunday, 9:00 to 18:00. For more information, please visit http://www.porsche.com/museum.

SOURCE

Communication Porsche AG
Porsche Museum

 

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Porsche Museum New special exhibition until 26 May 2013

Built in Zuffenhausen – Construction and architecture

of the Porsche Museum

Visitors to the special exhibition will learn more about the construction techniques employed for the museum from a selection of material samples.

Visitors to the special exhibition will learn more about the construction techniques employed for the museum from a selection of material samples.

 

Stuttgart. Ever since it first opened in 2009, the Porsche Museum has fascinated visitors with its combination of unique vehicles and stunning architecture.

From now until 26 May 2013, a special exhibition staged by the sports automobile manufacturer will show the making of what is probably the most spectacular architectural project in the history of the company. For the first time, diverse exhibits and technical drawings will explain how the museum came into being and present the structural challenges involved in its creation.

Diverse exhibits and technical drawings will explain the structural challenges involved in its creation.

Diverse exhibits and technical drawings will explain the structural challenges involved in its creation.

“Built in Zuffenhausen” will be centred around the design by Delugan Meissl Associated Architects of Vienna, winner of the architects’ competition in 2005. Visitors to the special exhibition will also learn more about the construction techniques employed for the museum from a selection of material samples. Plans and models submitted by the architectural practices which participated in the competition can likewise be admired – some of them never before seen in public.

The simple facts and figures about the museum building are equally impressive. More tons of steel were used to build the Porsche Museum, for instance, than the Eiffel Tower in Paris. The monolithic body, weighing 35.000 tons, rises 45 metres above Porsche Square and is supported on a highly complex steel skeleton.

Resting on just three V-shaped columns, the museum’s dominant main structure appears to hover in mid-air. Its central location on Porsche Square reflects the close ties with the sports automobile manufacturer and its Zuffenhausen headquarters. Today, the Porsche Museum is a centre of knowledge about the history of the sports car brand and Porsche Square would be unthinkable without it.

Visitors can take advantage of an extended themed tour covering both the museum itself and the special exhibition.

Visitors can take advantage of an extended themed tour covering both the museum itself and the special exhibition.

“Built in Zuffenhausen” is being used as an opportunity to supplement the one-hour architectural tour with a visit to the special exhibition. At 3 p.m. on Wednesdays and Sundays, visitors can take advantage of an extended themed tour covering both the museum itself and the special exhibition at a price of four euros per person (on top of the normal cost).

New special exhibition until 26 May 2013: Built in Zuffenhausen - Construction and architecture of the Porsche Museum

New special exhibition until 26 May 2013: Built in Zuffenhausen – Construction and architecture of the Porsche Museum

The Porsche Museum is open from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesdays to Sundays. The admission price is 8 euros for adults or 4 euros for children and concessions. Children up to the age of 14 are entitled to free admission when accompanied by an adult. More information can be found on the Internet at http://www.porsche.com/museum.

Source: Porsche AG Media Database

Communication Porsche AG
Porsche Museum

 

 

 

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VIDEO: TWO BOYS EXPERIENCE AT THE PORSCHE MUSEUM IN STUTTGART, THE WORLD OF SPORTS CARS

real deal.Standbild069

DREAMING? Fond of PORSCHES?
What if YOU could be ALL alone 1 NIGHT @ the PORSCHE MUSEUM? What would YOU want to SEE? …or sit in?
Two high-tech kids sneak inside the Porsche-Museum, …anything is possible.

Michael Köckritz, creative director and editor in chief of ramp tells this story in this shortcut. Simple and direct, ramp Auto.Kultur.Magazin
Song: The coast of French Cornwall composed, performed and recorded by David Ducaruge @ KMA19 Studios.
Executive Video Producer: CHRISTOPHER KIPPENBERGER 
DOP: Marcus Gelhard 
Creative Consultant: THEEMOTIONALFRIEND

 

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