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1955 Winter Vintage Porsche Motor Skiing (With a Twist) the World’s Most Dangerous Sport

motor-skiing-1

The roots of ‘skijoring’ or motor skiing can be traced back to Bavaria, circa 1955, when a group of Germanic lunatics decided it would be a good idea to use motorbikes, VW Beetles and Porsches to tow themselves around for fun.

Filmed in Bavaria, Germany. The skiers are towed behind cars travelling at great speed.

motor-skiing-2

The concept is simple enough: put a rope on a car or motorcycle, presumably equipped with studded snow tires, then have the driver navigate a race course at speeds up to 100 miles per hour.

motor-skiing-6

motor-skiing-8

Probably not considered the most dangerous sport by today’s standards!

motor-skiing-5

Evidently safety was not as big of a concern back then either. The speeds and proximities to other skiers in this clip are unlike anyone would have attempted.

motor-skiing-3

motor-skiing-7

See the Teutonic madness, featuring Porsche 356s and even a Porsche 550 Spyder, a short but sensationalized video below.

You can spot the Porsche 550 Spyders in the video, and what appears to be Otto Mathe’s famous 4 cam-powered single seat racer, which you can see in person visiting the Prototype Museum in Hamburg.

Probably the Gmund 040, then used by Otto Mathe to tow his ice racer

Source: The British Pathé Film Archive

All 90,000 British Pathe reels can be viewed and enjoyed on:http://www.britishpathe.com

World’s Most Dangerous Sport (1955). Filmed in Bavaria, Germany. Skiers are towed by cars and motorcycles travelling at great speed. Probably not considered the most dangerous sport by today’s standards!

 

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DOCUMENTARY FILM OCT 15TH, 2012: Meet MAGNUS WALKER – Urban Outlaw, rebel Porsche Customizer

Urban Outlaw

A portrait of Magnus Walker, the rebel Porsche customizer who turned a hobby into an obsession, and an obsession into a successful business.

,,,a sample of Magnus Walkers Porsche collection (photos by Magnus, collage created by dede seward)

From a workshop in downtown Los Angeles, Magnus obsessively harvests fragments from donor 911s, grafting them onto vintage frames to create one-of kind automobiles with the spirit of Ferdinand Porsche but an ethos entirely his own.

Inside the garage of Magnus Walker. Photo by: Magnus Walker

A few more Porsche 911s owned by Magnus Walker. Photo by: Magnus Walker

ABOUT Magnus Walker:

My love affair with PORSCHE began as a 10 year old kid, and a trip to the 1977 LONDON motor show.

That is where I laid my eyes upon a 77-930 Martini TURBO!
As a kid growing up in SHEFFIELD-ENGLAND Porches were not a common sight. Sure I had the TURBO poster on my wall, lusted after one, and even wrote a letter to the Porsche factory!

Hey… They even wrote back!
Saying words to the affect “give us a call back when you are older”.

Fast forward a few years, and in 1986 at the age of 19 I moved to America and started a new life in LOS ANGELES..

At the age of 25 in 1992 I acquired my first 911, now almost 20 years later and over 40 -911 cars later I am living my PORSCHE dream.

I have done some club racing and instructing with the POC throughout the past 10 years. Over the past few years I have been expanding my 64-73 early car collection and have been building quite a few “sports purpose” R -ST inspired streetable track type cars.

My builds are starting to gain world wide attention, and a few unique touches such as my grafted R turn signals, louvered deck lids, drilled door handles and attention to detail to name a few are becoming my “signature marks”.

Magnus Walker poses with his 1971 Porsche 911. Photo by Magnus Walker.

Magnus Walker The Outlaw. The Trailer.

Producer / Director: Tamir Moscovici (MOS), Industry Films
Line Producer: Dwight Phipps, Industry Films
DP: Anthony Arendt, Partos
Editor: Paul Proulx, Stealing Time
Colourist: Wade Odlum, Alter Ego
Audio House: Pirate Toronto

mosmedia.ca
industryfilms.com
urbanoutlaw.tv

Random 911 Porsches

LONDON CALLING……..

Its official URBAN OUTLAW short documentary film
accepted into the RAINDANCE FILM FESTIVAL in London.

Urban Outlaw | Raindance Film Festival 2012

“The film, a passion project, would never have been funded in the traditional studio system.  Through word of mouth, enthusiasts, bloggers and journalist, we have built a global fan base, our fans are passionate, and we don’t want to make them wait any longer.”  – Tamir Moscovici

Supplemental,…In association with MOS MEDIA, INDUSTRY FILMS & MAGNUSWALKER911.COM

is proud to announce the release of URBAN OUTLAW. URBAN OUTLAW

will be distributed & released worldwide online via Reelhouse.org.

  RELEASE DATE: Oct 15 2012  

Since the trailer was released in late May of 2012 it obtained over a 1.2 million click throughs.  The initial intent was to submit the film to festivals.  Since submitting the film to festivals and competitions the film has won a prestigious Award of Merit from the Best Shorts Competition, for short documentary.  The film is schedule to debut in London at the Raindance Film Festival on Sept. 28 2012and will play in Atlanta and Edmonton shortly there after.

While the film continues to navigate the festival circuit, Tamir & Magnus have decided that limiting the viewership to select cities, with limited seating, would be the wrong choice for the film. .  Following  Raindance the film will be made available online.

“The film, a passion project, would never have been funded in the traditional studio system.  Through word of mouth, enthusiasts, bloggers and journalist, we have built a global fan base, our fans are passionate, and we don’t want to make them wait any longer. “  – Tamir Moscovici 

We’ve opted to go with Reelhouse.org, a new platform for film audiences.  Knowing that we were going to release the film globally we wanted a platform that could create a theatrical experience that was intimate.  Reelhouse is more then a micro site, or faceless link for audiences to view.

Through Reelhouse.org viewers can reach out toMagnus Walker and to the filmmaker.  In the spirit of Louis C.K., and the filmmakers behind Press Pause Play, this is a new age in filmmaking, let’s cut out the distributors, studios and marketers.  Let good film connect with an audience, and let that audience connect with the filmmakers.

If the audience likes the film, they can support the filmmakers.  In short, let’s continue down the path of accessible art for the masses.

 WATCH IT HERE: http://www.reelhouse.org/mos/urbanoutlaw

Source: Magnus Walker himself

reelhouse.org/mos/urbanoutlaw

Reelhouse reelhouse.org

 

 

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What’s on the hood of every Porsche? – The complex re-production of the Porsche Crest, made in Germany

Relaunch of the original Porsche Crest from 1954 – 1973

It’s the little things that make a classic complete. Porsche crests for the Porsche 356 and the early 911, of course, “Made in Germany”.

The original crest as a quality seal.

An essential and much-loved detail of the Porsche 356 and the early Porsche 911 is now available again. Following extensive research, the experts at Porsche Classic have reproduced the original Porsche crest.

The Evolution of Porsche Crest

The relaunched crest is true to the colours and materials of the original and is, of course, “Made in Germany”. The new Porsche Crests are available for the front hood handle of all Porsche 356 (model year 1954 – 1965) and for the hood of the early 911 models (model year 1963 – 1973). As of August 2012, you can order them via your local Porsche centre.

1. Production of the special tool: engraving

Still in the Classic product range are the 911 Porsche Crests for the model years 1974 – 1998.

Such an unmistakeable and sought-after symbol has naturally had a very colourful and sometimes unusual history and been copied many times.

2. Stamping of the blanks

To eliminate all doubt, the experts at Porsche Classic delved deep into the history of the crest, which was first suggested as a quality seal for the Type 356 at a meeting between Ferry Porsche and US importer Max Hoffman back in 1952.

3. Brazing of the fixing pins

In the same year, advertising manager Herrmann Lapper and designer Franz Xaver Reimspieß produced a preliminary design that is still used to this day with just a few minor differences in detail. Reimspieß, who is also said to have designed the Volkswagen logo in 1936, sketched a magnificent crest that symbolised the roots of the company as well as the dynamism and quality of its products.

4. Polishing of the crests

At the centre of the golden shield, the horse of the official coat of arms of Stuttgart is depicted along with the name of the city. The composition is surrounded by the red and black state colours and the stylised antlers from the crest of Württemberg-Hohenzollern. The all-encompassing Porsche logo acts as a protective “roof” over all the design elements.

5. Silver and gold plating of the crests

In contrast to the current crest, the Porsche logo on the original crest was only embossed and was not black. In addition, the red elements of the crest were actually more orange in colour to reflect the Württemberg-Hohenzollern state colours.

6. Application of the enamel coating

The Classic experts charged with reproducing the crest went a lot further than merely ensuring that the colours were true to the original. The crest is being produced using special tools based on original drawings. The silver and gold plating is being applied using the same technique as the original and the colour and enamelling are being meticulously applied by hand.

7. Quality check of the final crest

The new “old” crest has also had to undergo the same quality tests as the original. This involved the simulation of a stone impact test using a ballistic firing range at the Research and Development Centre in Weissach. The crest also spent 240 hours in the salt spray chamber.

The Porsche crest passed these challenging tests with flying colours, thus proving its credentials as a genuine quality product, 100 per cent made in Germany.

The Evolution of Porsche Crest

This symbol, steeped in history, signals a continued long life for classic Porsche models.

Paraphrasing from “Excellence was Expected”:

The design was created by Ferry Porsche (on the proverbial napkin sketch) at the request of Max Hoffman, and refined/finalized by Erwin Komeda. The emblem first appeared on the steering wheel hubs of Porsches in 1953.

SOURCE: Porsche AG Media Database

 
2 Comments

Posted by on September 15, 2012 in Germany, Porsche, PORSCHE CREST, Porsche Design, Weissach

 

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1955 Winter Vintage Porsche Motor Skiing (With a Twist) the World’s Most Dangerous Sport

motor-skiing-1

The roots of ‘skijoring’ or motor skiing can be traced back to Bavaria, circa 1955, when a group of Germanic lunatics decided it would be a good idea to use motorbikes, VW Beetles and Porsches to tow themselves around for fun.

Filmed in Bavaria, Germany. The skiers are towed behind cars travelling at great speed.

motor-skiing-2

The concept is simple enough: put a rope on a car or motorcycle, presumably equipped with studded snow tires, then have the driver navigate a race course at speeds up to 100 miles per hour.

motor-skiing-6

motor-skiing-8

Probably not considered the most dangerous sport by today’s standards!

motor-skiing-5

Evidently safety was not as big of a concern back then either. The speeds and proximities to other skiers in this clip are unlike anyone would have attempted.

motor-skiing-3

motor-skiing-7

See the Teutonic madness, featuring Porsche 356s and even a Porsche 550 Spyder, a short but sensationalized video below.

You can spot the Porsche 550 Spyders in the video, and what appears to be Otto Mathe’s famous 4 cam-powered single seat racer, which you can see in person visiting the Prototype Museum in Hamburg.

Probably the Gmund 040, then used by Otto Mathe to tow his ice racer

Source: The British Pathé Film Archive

All 90,000 British Pathe reels can be viewed and enjoyed on:http://www.britishpathe.com

World’s Most Dangerous Sport (1955). Filmed in Bavaria, Germany. Skiers are towed by cars and motorcycles travelling at great speed. Probably not considered the most dangerous sport by today’s standards!

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
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