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VIDEO: PORSCHE 918 SPYDER WORKSHOP – Looking forward to this in 2013-2014 Santa Claus!

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shhhhhhhhh….Ho! Ho! Ho! don’t tell Mrs Claus, I’m thinking about trading in the sleigh for one of these for 2013! PORSCHE 918 SPYDER @ Barber Motorsports Park

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Santa Claus has visited 918 Spyder Research and Development Centre in Weissach (Baden-Württemberg) making decisions for NEXT year’s RIDE!

Just an ordinary picture to tickle our cheekbones……

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Note..auto journalist Georg Kacher in the light blue
Amazing image of the assembly workshop of Porsche 918 Spyder prototypes. It shows nine.

For those who follow 918 Spyder, each news is very good. An image of the assembly workshop prototype 918 Spyder . Obviously, they are not all there, but still counted nine 918 prototypes. Some are equipped with supplied “Martini“, others recover 917 sets of prototypes involved in the 24 Hours of Le Mans in the past.

The place where all the 918 prototypes are…..

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Power up: the Porsche 918 Spyder

The future is an exciting place, and here’s one of the people bringing it closer. Meet Dr Frank Walliser, who takes us behind the development of one of Porsche’s most thrilling leaps in innovation, the Porsche 918 Spyder.

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The  final series of the 918 Spyder will be presented at the Frankfurt Motor Show in 2013 when the first deliveries are scheduled for the end of next year.

 

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VIDEO: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup New Edition of the world’s most successful race car

Stuttgart. The Porsche 911 GT3 Cup is the most successful race car in the world. Since 1998, 2,395 units of the near standard vehicle for customer sport were produced.

The new edition of the 911 GT3 Cup is the motorsports version of the future 911 GT3 and as such is the first race car that is based on the seventh generation of the sports car icon from Zuffenhausen.

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

The 911 GT3 Cup will be run exclusively in the Porsche Mobil 1 Supercup in 2013.

Porsche 991 GT3 Cup Car - Huge Wing Edition-2

The car for one-make racing made its debut on the occasion of the end of motorsport season “Night of Champions” celebration at the R&D Centre in Weissach.

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

The new Porsche 911 GT3 Cup is powered by a 3.8-litre six-cylinder flat engine. It generates 460 hp (338 kW) at 7,500 revs, surpassing the predecessor by 10 hp.

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

A six-speed dog-type gearbox developed by Porsche Motorsport which is operated via shift paddles at the steering wheel for the first time in a Porsche brand trophy race car transmits the power to the rear axle.

The single piece race wheels with centre mount were also newly designed by Porsche Motorsport.

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

The width of the Michelin race slicks was increased by two centimetres to 27 centimetres at the front and by ten millimetres at the rear axle to now measure 31 centimetres.

Porsche 991 GT3 Cup Car - Huge Wing Edition-1

A newly developed race braking system further improves the excellent endurance qualities compared to its successful predecessor. The 380 millimetre slotted and inner-vented steel brake rotors at the front axle are decelerated by six-piston aluminium fixed callipers. The rear axle features a four-piston version.

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

During the development of the new car a particular emphasis was put on the driver safety. A newly designed safety cage protects the pilot in case of a roll or a collision as does a newly developed race seat which is distinctively shaped around the head and shoulders and can be adjusted individually with the help of padding. A rescue hatch in the roof provides easy access for primary medical attention and for the extrication of the driver.

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

“The new 911 GT3 Cup is much easier to drive at the limit,” says Porsche works driver Timo Bernhard, who was significantly involved in the development of the new vehicle.

“The car is excellently balanced. The new axle geometry is enormously positive for the handling. Apart from that the new Cup 911 is great fun to drive.”

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Like its predecessor the new Porsche 911 GT3 Cup is produced in Stuttgart-Zuffenhausen on the same assembly line as the road legal models.

Porsche 991 GT3 Cup Car - Huge Wing Edition-3

At the Motorsport Centre in Weissach it receives a general set-up for the circuit and is tested by a professional race driver before delivery to the customers. The basic price for the vehicle, which is available exclusively in white, is 181,200 Euro plus the country-specific value added tax.

SOURCE: Porsche AG Media Database Porsche 911 GT3 Cup

Communication Porsche AG
Motorsport Press

 

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Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Successful Testing / lap time 7 mins 14 secs on the “Nürburgring-Nordschleife”

Press Release 19/09/2012

Porsche 918 Spyder-Prototyp auf der Nürburgring-Nordschleife

Stuttgart. On September 18th, in test drives on the “Nürburgring-Nordschleife”, a Porsche 918 Spyder prototype turned in a remarkable best time of just 07:14 minutes for the 20.6 km long circuit.

Porsche 918 Spyder-Prototyp auf der Nürburgring-Nordschleife

One year before its production launch, the plug-in hybrid super sports car from Porsche AG is already proving its superlative dynamic performance potential far surpassing all expectations placed in it. Dr. Frank Walliser, overall project leader for the 918 Spyder:

“By turning in a fabulous time of 07:14 minutes, the 918 Spyder prototype has already fully confirmed the viability of its future concept after just a few months on the road.”

Dr. Frank Walliser, Gesamtprojektleiter 918 Spyder

The lap time of the Porsche 918 Spyder prototype is one of the best ever clocked for street-legal vehicles with standard production tyres.

Porsche 918 Spyder-Prototyp auf der Nürburgring-Nordschleife

The course was only available to the development team from Weissach for one lap, and it had to be started from a standstill.

Porsche 918 Spyder-Prototyp auf der Nürburgring-Nordschleife

The plug-in hybrid super sports car with over 795 hp was equipped with production tyres from development partner Michelin as well as the optional “Weissach” package, which integrates modifications that boost driving performance.

Porsche 918 Spyder-Prototyp auf der Nürburgring-Nordschleife

SOURCE: Porsche AG Media Database

Product and Technology Communication
Product Communication

 

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What’s on the hood of every Porsche? – The complex re-production of the Porsche Crest, made in Germany

Relaunch of the original Porsche Crest from 1954 – 1973

It’s the little things that make a classic complete. Porsche crests for the Porsche 356 and the early 911, of course, “Made in Germany”.

The original crest as a quality seal.

An essential and much-loved detail of the Porsche 356 and the early Porsche 911 is now available again. Following extensive research, the experts at Porsche Classic have reproduced the original Porsche crest.

The Evolution of Porsche Crest

The relaunched crest is true to the colours and materials of the original and is, of course, “Made in Germany”. The new Porsche Crests are available for the front hood handle of all Porsche 356 (model year 1954 – 1965) and for the hood of the early 911 models (model year 1963 – 1973). As of August 2012, you can order them via your local Porsche centre.

1. Production of the special tool: engraving

Still in the Classic product range are the 911 Porsche Crests for the model years 1974 – 1998.

Such an unmistakeable and sought-after symbol has naturally had a very colourful and sometimes unusual history and been copied many times.

2. Stamping of the blanks

To eliminate all doubt, the experts at Porsche Classic delved deep into the history of the crest, which was first suggested as a quality seal for the Type 356 at a meeting between Ferry Porsche and US importer Max Hoffman back in 1952.

3. Brazing of the fixing pins

In the same year, advertising manager Herrmann Lapper and designer Franz Xaver Reimspieß produced a preliminary design that is still used to this day with just a few minor differences in detail. Reimspieß, who is also said to have designed the Volkswagen logo in 1936, sketched a magnificent crest that symbolised the roots of the company as well as the dynamism and quality of its products.

4. Polishing of the crests

At the centre of the golden shield, the horse of the official coat of arms of Stuttgart is depicted along with the name of the city. The composition is surrounded by the red and black state colours and the stylised antlers from the crest of Württemberg-Hohenzollern. The all-encompassing Porsche logo acts as a protective “roof” over all the design elements.

5. Silver and gold plating of the crests

In contrast to the current crest, the Porsche logo on the original crest was only embossed and was not black. In addition, the red elements of the crest were actually more orange in colour to reflect the Württemberg-Hohenzollern state colours.

6. Application of the enamel coating

The Classic experts charged with reproducing the crest went a lot further than merely ensuring that the colours were true to the original. The crest is being produced using special tools based on original drawings. The silver and gold plating is being applied using the same technique as the original and the colour and enamelling are being meticulously applied by hand.

7. Quality check of the final crest

The new “old” crest has also had to undergo the same quality tests as the original. This involved the simulation of a stone impact test using a ballistic firing range at the Research and Development Centre in Weissach. The crest also spent 240 hours in the salt spray chamber.

The Porsche crest passed these challenging tests with flying colours, thus proving its credentials as a genuine quality product, 100 per cent made in Germany.

The Evolution of Porsche Crest

This symbol, steeped in history, signals a continued long life for classic Porsche models.

Paraphrasing from “Excellence was Expected”:

The design was created by Ferry Porsche (on the proverbial napkin sketch) at the request of Max Hoffman, and refined/finalized by Erwin Komeda. The emblem first appeared on the steering wheel hubs of Porsches in 1953.

SOURCE: Porsche AG Media Database

 
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Posted by on September 15, 2012 in Germany, Porsche, PORSCHE CREST, Porsche Design, Weissach

 

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Porsche 918 Spyder Prototype Goes For a Test Drive

The Porsche 918 Spyder is coming.

Production of the most anticipated Porsche starts at the company’s Stuttgart plant on Sept. 18, 2013 with only 918 units to be produced. Porsche will start selling the car for a starting price tag of $845,000 and the first customer cars will begin arriving in the United States near the end of 2013.

That’s quite a bit time. But before all that happens, Porsche decided to give a select few a first ride in a very early prototype for the 918 Spyder.

A ride in a 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder prototype, the only one in the world at a remote test track, a gaggle of Porsche engineers are at work, surrounded by all sorts of data-logging equipment. And there, in the middle of it all, is the 918.

The first ever Porsche 918 Spyder to run under its own means is nothing more than a rolling chassis pieced together so engineers can test its gasoline-electric hybrid drivetrain.

Partly covered in modified Porsche 911 body panels and flaunting outrageous exhaust pipes that sprout up from the engine bay at the rear (a feature we’re assured will be retained for production), it is a long way from the 918 Spyder concept that basked in the spotlight at the 2010 Geneva Auto Show.

“The production version will be very similar to the concept car in overall appearance,” Frank Walliser, chief engineer for the 918 program.

“There will be some changes, like these tailpipes. This is really just a systems mule that we’re using to sort the various gasoline-electric hybrid components and its electronics package before we begin construction of road-going prototypes back in Weissach (Porsche’s research and development center in Germany).”

As we know the Porsche 918 Spyder by now. Mere months after its unveiling, Porsche confirmed it would put the supercar into production as a successor to the celebrated Carrera GT, starting on September 18, 2013.

Just 918 examples are planned, each running down a dedicated line that is being established in a former paint shop at the car maker’s Zuffenhausen headquarters in Germany. It is the same factory that builds the latest Boxster and 911 — a holy grail to true Porsche fans, no less.

Waking Up the Engine
The Porsche engineers make some adjustments to the prototype’s electronics, which are housed in a makeshift aluminum box strapped to an area that will eventually be occupied by the production car’s rear spoiler. Walliser’s boss, Wolfgang Hatz, Porsche’s chief of research and development, slides down into the driver seat and twists a key in the left-hand-mounted ignition. Odd whirring sounds rise up from underneath before the gasoline engine catches and fills the garage with a deep pulsating blare of exhaust from those prominent tailpipes.

The centerpiece of the new Porsche is its mid-rear-mounted V8 gasoline engine, seated on traditional rubber mounts (rather than the hydraulic mounts used on the 911) within a carbon-fiber cradle that is attached to the back of the main tub by six prominent mounting points.

Similar to the 90-degree V8 used in the Porsche RS Spyder successfully campaigned in the American Le Mans series between 2005 and 2008, the engine has gained 1.2 liters of displacement, going from 3.4 liters in race trim up to 4.6 liters in this application.

Walliser describes the engine as “entirely new,” noting that it features an all-new crankcase, cylinder head design and low-reciprocating-mass internals, plus that radical exhaust system that sees two pipes exit just behind the integral carbon-fiber roll hoops. The point of this arrangement is to keep hot exhaust gases well away from the car’s heat-sensitive battery pack mounted down low directly behind the tub.

Let’s Talk About the Numbers
The revamped V8 has been tuned to rev to a dizzying 9,200 rpm (though in its current state of tune, it has a lower redline), and owing to its racing gene, Walliser promises it will deliver the same razor-sharp throttle response as the Carrera GT’s 5.7-liter V10. Porsche engineers tell us the V8 makes about 562 horsepower.

But the 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder is a hybrid, remember, so it also has a pair of synchronous electric motors — one mounted up front acting exclusively on the front wheels with 107 hp, and a second, 121-hp motor attached to the rear of the gasoline engine providing drive to the rear wheels. We’re told total system power will be in the neighborhood of 759 hp, with 568 pound-feet of torque.

Barely containing his delight at finally getting to show off the 918 Spyder to someone other than an engineer, Hatz gingerly guides the prototype out of the garage. After prodding the throttle a couple times to release some heat into the engine and its peripheries, he speeds off into the distance. We scramble back into the Multivan and catch up with the prototype at the end of an immense test track. The engineering team has spent the 10 days here at the track methodically running through the first systems test of the new car.

This car will offer five driving modes. There’s “e power” for all-electric operation, a “hybrid” mode that allows either electric or gasoline operation, followed by “sport hybrid,” which is the first of three performance-oriented gasoline-electric modes. Beyond that, “race hybrid” calls up even further levels of performance, while “hot lap” unleashes all the battery’s remaining power for short periods of what Walliser describes as overboost.

How Quick Is It?
Nothing is official just yet, but Porsche is aiming for a curb weight around 1,700 kg (3,747 pounds), with 0-62-mph acceleration in less than 3 seconds.

Officials also hint at a 0-124-mph time of less than 9 seconds and zero to 186 mph in less than 27 seconds — quicker than the Carrera GT. Top speed, achieved with the help of a series of active aerodynamic functions including diffuser elements behind the front wheels and a multistage rear wing that extends to a maximum height of 4.7 inches, is pegged at 202 mph

The Chassis
The 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder prototype rides on a unique chassis made almost entirely from cast-aluminum components. The suspension is a combination of double wishbones at the front and a multilink setup in back, but unlike the system on the Carrera GT, which used a racecarlike pushrod system attached to the unit-body, the 918 has conventional springs and dampers sited outboard near the center-lock-style wheels, which measure 20 inches up front and 21 inches in the rear and are wrapped in 265/35R20 and 325/35R21 Michelin Pilot Sport Cup rubber.

Computer simulations suggest the production car will be capable of generating up to a 1.4g on the skid pad (though that’s a maximum figure, rather than the average lateral acceleration we customarily report). He also drops a Nurburgring claim: Porsche is targeting 7 minutes, 22 seconds on the Nordschleife — still well short of the Dodge Viper’s 7:12, but moving nonetheless.

Even in early prototype form, the 2014 Porsche 918 Spyder is hugely impressive. There’s still a long way to go — another 18 months of intensive development, no less. But as our ride comes to an end, we’re struck by just how far Porsche’s engineering team has come during just 10 days of development work on the rolling chassis.

In the next phase, Porsche will build 23 road-going prototypes. Stay tuned.                          Read the original:
Porsche gives some a first ride in the 918 Spyder prototype …

What have we seen so far?

 evo’s Editorial Director and Founder Harry Metcalfe has a look at the future of the supercar.

  • From Top GearThe performance headlines are this. Acceleration from 0-62mph in ‘less than three’ seconds. Zero to 125mph in a time that almost matches a Bugatti Veyron. And a Nürburgring lap time (so far verified only on Porsche’s supernaturally accurate simulators), of 7.22. That’s 10 seconds faster than the old Carrera GT, and 10 seconds.

  • From AutoWeekAs if that’s not enough, Porsche also says its new supercar will boast a combined city/highway fuel-consumption figure of more than 78.4 mpg (U.S.) on the current European cycle. By comparison, the Carrera GT returned just 13.2 mpg (U.S.) under the same test procedure.

  • From WiredPorsche pulled a variant of the 4.6-liter V8 originally fitted to the three-time ALMS LMP2 Championship-winning RS Spyder. That engine put out a comparatively paltry 503 horsepower, but fitted to the 918, output is up to 570 hp. That figure is before you account for the 918′s two electric motors, and it’s also where the similarities to past supercars ends.

 

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Go-ahead for the extension of the new R & D Porsche site in Weissach

Weissach R&D – Picture of site – (l.-r.): Walter Uhl, Chairman of Works Council of Porsche Weissach, Thomas Fritsch, Mayor of Mönsheim, Ursula Kreutel, Mayor of Weissach, Matthias Müller, Chairman of the Board of Management of Porsche AG, Wolfgang Hatz, Board member in charge of Research and Development of Porsche AG and Uwe Hück, Chairman of the Group Works Council of Porsche AG.

First cut of the spade in Weissach: start of extensive building work at the Development Centre

Stuttgart. With the symbolic first cut of the spade, Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG, Stuttgart, today heralded the start of the extension of its Research and Development Centre in Weissach (Baden-Württemberg).

Research and Development Centre in Weissach (Baden-Württemberg)

The site is being enlarged through the addition of a highly modern design studio, a high-tech wind tunnel and an electronics integration centre. Porsche is investing around 150 million euro in this respect. Matthias Müller, Chairman of the Board of Management, welcomed Ursula Kreutel, Mayor of Weissach, Thomas Fritsch, Mayor of Mönsheim, Roland Bernhard, Chief Executive of the Böblingen District, and Karl Röckinger, Chief Executive of the Enz District, at the groundbreaking ceremony.

Research and Development Centre in Weissach (Baden-Württemberg)

“The extension of our Development Centre is a good, far-sighted investment in the future of Porsche”, said Matthias Müller, Chairman of the Board of Management of Porsche AG. “The expansion being made by Porsche in Weissach also represents a clear commitment to Baden-Württemberg as an industrial location.

” Uwe Hück, Chairman of the Group Works Council, added: “These investments which we agreed in July 2010 to safeguard the site – ‘Independence through competitive advantage’ – will not only protect the jobs of our permanent staff, but will actually increase the number of permanent jobs. This will strengthen the independence of Porsche.”

Research and Development Centre in Weissach (Baden-Württemberg)

The new wind tunnel will also enable the Stuttgart-based sports car manufacturer to cope with technological challenges in vehicle development in future.

“Good aerodynamics make a major contribution towards low fuel consumption and high performance – both of which are important aspects in implementing Porsche Intelligent Performance”, said Wolfgang Hatz, Board member in charge of Research and Development of Porsche AG.

The new electronics integration centre will combine segments which were previously spread over several buildings.

“Our objective is also to continue developing electric and hybrid technology. We are creating the ideal conditions for attaining this objective with our new electronics integration centre”, added Hatz.

“Thanks to Porsche, we have the highest per capita trade tax revenue in the whole of Germany. The town will also profit from the extension of the Development Centre”, said Ursula Kreutel, Mayor of Weissach with confidence. Thomas Fritsch, Mayor of Mönsheim, agreed with his fellow Mayor: “Porsche is a great addition for the surrounding towns. We are therefore now all the more delighted with the extension of the Research Centre.”

Research and Development Centre in Weissach (Baden-Württemberg)

In addition to the extension of the site, Porsche is starting a wide-ranging human resources campaign. In the first six months of 2011, the company recruited well over 100 new engineers. Over 100 new employees will also be appointed by the end of 2011 in order to support the around 3,400 staff currently working in Weissach.

The new offices and the design studio will probably be ready for occupation in summer 2013. The wind tunnel will be completed in the first six months of 2014.

SOURCE: Porsche AG Media Database

Public Relations and Media
Corporate Press
Dirk Erat

 

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